Research news

  • Water filter from wood offers portable, eco-friendly purification in emergencies

    Published Mar 21, 2017
    What can the forests of Scandinavia possibly offer to migrants in faraway refugee camps? Clean water may be one thing.

  • New treatment attacks liver disease and type 2 diabetes

    Published Mar 02, 2017
    Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology are planning the clinical trial of a new treatment for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes which harnesses liver cells’ own ability to burn accumulated fats.

  • Heart’s hydraulics proven for the first time

    Published Mar 02, 2017
    While scientists agree that the heart relies on hydraulic forces to fill up with blood, for whatever reason these forces have never been measured – that is, until now.

  • 24 million to “New Directions in Learning Dynamical Systems”

    Published Mar 02, 2017
    In the end of February, the Swedish Research Council announced their decision regarding grants in Natural and Engineering Sciences. Four research groups from KTH received a total of 96 million SEK, and one of them is led by Håkan Hjalmarsson, professor in automatic control.

  • Closer look at atomic motion in molecules may benefit biotech researchers

    Published Feb 15, 2017
    Every molecule holds a complex landscape of moving atoms – and the ability to single out and examine individual nuclear vibrations may unlock to the secret to predicting and controlling chemical reactions. Now, a new method, developed by researchers in Sweden, enables biotech researchers to do just that.

  • New theory explains how Earth’s inner core remains solid despite extreme heat

    Published Feb 13, 2017
    Even though it is hotter than the surface of the Sun, the crystallized iron core of the Earth remains solid. A new study from KTH Royal Institute of Technology may finally settle a longstanding debate over how that’s possible, as well as why seismic waves travel at higher speeds between the planet’s poles than through the equator.

  • Silk from milk? New method binds proteins into threads

    Published Feb 08, 2017
    By all appearances, cows have little in common with spiders. Yet despite the two species’ obvious differences, new research shows that ordinary milk can be used to spin artificial silk – a breakthrough that could open new doors for alternative plastics and regenerative medicine.

  • Now drivers can hear ambulances no matter how loud their music is playing

    Published Jan 16, 2017
    If you’ve ever been startled by the sudden appearance of an ambulance while blasting music in your car, then you appreciate the value of a loud siren. Fortunately, your car is probably equipped already to receive warning signals on its audio system, thanks to a new solution developed by students at KTH.

  • With new tool, cities can plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits

    Published Jan 09, 2017
    The rollout of Sweden’s first wireless charging buses earlier this month was coupled with something the rest of the world could use – namely, a tool for cities to determine the environmental and financial benefits of introducing their own electrified bus networks.

  • Unveiling of Cell Atlas points to new understanding of health and disease

    Published Dec 14, 2016
    Researchers from Science for Life Laboratory at KTH have achieved another significant milestone in the wake of the completion of the human genome in 2001. At the 2016 American Society of Cell Biology Meeting in San Francisco earlier this month, they presented the Cell Atlas, an open-access interactive database with unparalleled high-resolution images which visualizes for the first time the location of more than 12,000 proteins in cells.

  • Skin patch with microneedles proves effective alternative to injections

    Published Dec 12, 2016
    It’s only a matter of time before drugs are administered via patches with painless microneedles instead of unpleasant injections. But designers need to balance the need for flexible, comfortable-to-wear material with effective microneedle penetration of the skin. Researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm say they may have cracked the problem.

  • Probe offers more accurate detection of biomarker for cancer and other diseases

    Published Dec 07, 2016
    A new technique offers better sensitivity and accuracy in detecting an essential biomarker of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  • New research shows one way LED efficiency is far from optimal

    Published Nov 25, 2016
    Even though LED lights are among the most energy efficient available, there’s still plenty of room for improvement. Researchers recently found that light emitting diodes’ efficiency can be impeded by trace amounts of iron, which is a byproduct of LED production.

  • Risks with aneurysm surgery made clearer with mathematical model, researchers say

    Published Nov 10, 2016
    Even though operating on an abdominal aortic aneurysm can be risky, there are no patient-specific guidelines for deciding the optimal time for surgery. A mathematical model developed by Swedish researchers offers a way to guide doctors in making the right choices for individual patients.

  • Sensors to monitor bridges – and even enable them to tweet

    Published Oct 31, 2016
    While bridge collapses are rare, there have been enough of them to raise concerns in some parts of the world that their condition is not sufficiently monitored. Sweden is taking a hi-tech approach to its aging infrastructure. Researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm are rigging up the country’s bridges with multiple sensors that allow early detection of wear and tear. The bridges can even tweet throughout the course of a day.

  • Project receives EUR 3.2 million to explore limits of efficient computability

    Published Oct 28, 2016
    Research dealing with complex computational problems and the methods for solving them is one of the projects at KTH that recently received funding from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  • Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution

    Published Oct 25, 2016
    For all of its benefit to society, the technology we use for medical imaging is nevertheless flawed. Relevant little details go undetected due to limitations in resolution. But a recent investment in research at KTH aims to improve the picture – by at least 10 times.

  • Technique could lower cost of making bioplastics and biofuel

    Published Oct 19, 2016
    The potential for at least partly replacing oil with cellulose as a renewable source of energy and materials has just improved.

  • Low cost method for examining single leukemia cells could transform treatment

    Published Oct 14, 2016
    Leukemia is a disease in which each cell can exhibit different genetic traits, and now KTH researchers have found a cheap way to examine individual leukemia cells. Reported in Nature Communications, the breakthrough could transform leukemia treatment.

  • Nobel economics theory supports KTH research into small business financing

    Published Oct 12, 2016
    Research in contract theory, which was recognized by the Nobel Prize in Economics, is being used at KTH Royal Instiute of Technology to examine the impact of the financial crisis on small businesses.

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