Research news

  • Teamwork lifts research

    Published Nov 27, 2018
    Team work, cutting-edge research and interdisciplinary science; these are fundamental pillars in KTH's research, and determiners of its reputation.

  • Reducing consumption is climate smart – but how to make it attractive?

    Published Nov 23, 2018
    Borrow your neighbour’s ladder. Repair that broken bike. Share your wardrobe. There’s more to sustainable consumption than simply buying eco-labeled products. Karin Bradley heads a research project that aims to make sustainability the easiest choice.

  • Large portion of Amazon rain forest could lose legal protection

    Published Nov 14, 2018
    Nearly 150,000 square kilometers of the Amazon rain forest in Brazil is at risk of losing its legal protection, according to a new Swedish-Brazilian study involving KTH.

  • Super-strong, bio-compatible material may reduce broken fillings

    Published Nov 09, 2018
    Soon you may no longer have to worry about how long your dental repairs will last. A new dental reconstruction material developed at KTH offers unprecedented improvements over existing acrylate-based fillers.

  • Robots that lend a “hand” carrying objects are a breakthrough for human-machine cooperation

    Published Oct 26, 2018
    Physical interaction between robots and humans is advancing to a new level, as researchers report.

  • New method of mapping the voice could improve the treatment of voice patients

    Published Oct 25, 2018
    The measurement methods commonly used in voice therapy do not usually take into account how different individual voices are. A new thesis from KTH presents a method by which a person´s entire voice range can be measured. In particular, various aspects of the quality of the voice can be can be quantified. The method can be of great importance to people with voice problems, and also to singers who want to develop their voice.

  • Researchers may have figured out one way acne bacteria defies treatment

    Published Oct 22, 2018
    Researchers at KTH have discovered how acne-causing bacteria feed off their human hosts, opening the possibility for finding effective ways to treat severe acne.

  • Study shows faster, scalable way to make molecular semiconductors

    Published Oct 16, 2018
    Visions for what we can do with future electronics depend on finding ways to go beyond the capabilities of silicon conductors. The experimental field of molecular electronics is thought to represent a way forward, and recent work at KTH may enable scalable production of the nanoscale electrodes that are needed in order to explore molecules and exploit their behavior as potentially valuable electronic materials.

  • Machine learning competition seeks best models for mapping human proteins

    Published Oct 04, 2018
    Biomedical researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have opened up an online machine learning competition that will award USD 37,000 to be split among the creators of the best algorithms for classifying protein expression in images of human cells.

  • Ancient details of mummy’s hand revealed with advanced radiology technique

    Published Sep 27, 2018
    A mummified human hand from ancient Egypt was CT scanned by researchers at KTH to reveal unprecedented microscopic detail of soft tissues that are thousands of years old.

  • AI created more than 100,000 pieces of music after analyzing Irish and English folk tunes

    Published Sep 24, 2018
    At turns lively and yearning, the traditional folk musics of Ireland and Britain have made their mark around the world. Now this perennially popular music is helping computers learn to become a new kind of partner in music creation.

  • Dosed with crystal meth, brain-on-a-chip reveals brain's neurovascular interactions

    Published Aug 29, 2018
    Demonstrating the effects of the street drug, crystal meth, was the first test for a powerful new platform for studying the complex interactions of the brain’s blood vessels and nerve cells. Unveiled last week in an international study involving KTH researchers, the brain-on-a-chip model integrates living cells on microfluidic chips, enabling researchers to take a first-ever look at how disease and drugs affect the brain.

  • Mapping of cells and proteins improved with help of gamers and AI

    Published Aug 20, 2018
    Building on a map that shows hundreds of thousands of microscopic images of human cells, an international research team is working with the gaming community and with artificial intelligence to gain a more granular understanding of patterns of proteins arranged within the body’s cells.

  • A new software that democratises AI development

    Published Jul 10, 2018
    A new piece of software is making it easier to create solutions within AI (artificial intelligence). The program, QuantumNet, has been produced by KTH students who want more people to be involved in the creation of AI solutions. In addition, the program enables AI experts to develop AI models more efficiently.

  • AI could improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment

    Published Jun 26, 2018
    Researchers at KTH and Karolinska Institutet have concluded that AI can contribute to increased understanding of how prostate cancer develops, and even improve clinical diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  • Evidence for a new nuclear phase transition could rewrite physics textbooks

    Published Jun 21, 2018
    Physics textbooks might have to be updated now that an international research team has found evidence of an unexpected transition in the structure of atomic nuclei.

  • These nanoscale “crack-junctions” can speed up DNA sequencing

    Published Jun 19, 2018
    The time-consuming, expensive process of sequencing DNA molecules – a technology used to identify, diagnose and possibly find cures for diseases – could become a whole lot faster and cheaper as a result of a new nanofabrication method that takes advantage of nano-sized air-gaps, or nanocracks, in electrically conductive materials.

  • Method could be boost to large scale production of graphene

    Published Jun 15, 2018
    The measure by which any conductor is judged is how easily, and speedily, electrons can move through it. On this point, graphene is one of the most promising materials for a breathtaking array of applications. However, its ultra-high electron mobility is reduced when you synthesize larger sheets of the material. Now this barrier to industrial production of graphene may be broken as a result of new research done at KTH with universities in Germany.

  • Capillary flow is harnessed for the first time

    Published May 21, 2018
    You may have never heard of the capillary effect, but it’s something you deal with every time you wipe up a spill or put flowers in water. Wouter van der Wijngaart has spent most of his life contemplating this phenomenon, which enables liquid to flow through narrow spaces like the fibres of a cloth, or upwards through the stems of flowers, without help from gravity or other forces.

  • Platform brings mobile connection speeds up to 100 Gbps

    Published May 15, 2018
    Even though mobile internet link speeds might soon be 100 Gbps, this doesn’t necessarily mean network carriers will be free of data-handling challenges that effectively slow down mobile data services, for everything from individual device users to billions of internet-of-things connections.

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