Research news

  • Cancer survival tied to protein levels

    Published Aug 18, 2017
    Researchers from KTH have used a big data medical study to identify genes that could help doctors predict a cancer patient’s prognosis.

  • New observations reveal Crab Nebula's polarised emissions for first time

    Published Aug 10, 2017
    Since it was first observed little more than a thousand years ago, the Crab Nebula has been studied by generations of astronomers. Yet new observations by researchers at KTH show this “cosmic lighthouse” has yet to give up all of its secrets.

  • Mistaken antibodies may have led cancer research down a 20-year dead end

    Published Jun 15, 2017
    For nearly two decades researchers have sought a way to target an estrogen receptor in the hope they could improve breast cancer survival, but an article published today in Nature Communications contends that the effort may never pan out. The reason? The target receptor does not actually appear to be where they believe it to be.

  • Artist Jonas Gardell is awarded KTH Great Prize

    Published Jun 14, 2017
    Swedish author, playwright, comedian and artist Jonas Gardell was named as this year’s recipient of the KTH Stora Pris (Great Prize). Gardell has worked on behalf of the disenfranchised for many years and been recognized with a variety of honors and prizes.

  • Tool to reduce work related injuries available free

    Published Jun 14, 2017
    Employers can reduce the costs of occupational musculoskeletal disorders by using a free online risk management tool created by ergonomic researchers at KTH.

  • Switching to off-peak delivery times reduced city congestion

    Published May 23, 2017
    In some businesses – like supermarkets and restaurants – local restrictions on nighttime deliveries leave distributors no choice but to dispatch trucks during morning rush hours. But lifting these rules could reduce peak traffic volumes and increase transport efficiency, according to a recent study.

  • Strongest artificial spider silk synthesized with cellulose from wood

    Published May 16, 2017
    The strongest yet hybrid silk fibers have been created by scientists in Sweden using all renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable way to make bioactive materials for a wide range of medical uses.

  • Cell Atlas study reveals new insights into human biology

    Published May 11, 2017
    The first analysis of the physical arrangement of proteins in cells was published today in Science, revealing that a large portion of human proteins can be found in more than one location in a given cell.

  • Antioxidants and plastics could be made from byproducts of wheat milling

    Published Apr 12, 2017
    It’s usually used as livestock feed, but wheat bran’s value in human nutrition and medicine may soon reach its full potential with a new sustainable processing method developed by Swedish researchers.

  • New flu test easy as breathing, with faster results

    Published Mar 29, 2017
    A method for diagnosing flu virus from breath samples could soon replace invasive nasal swabs and deliver better results faster.

  • Plasma could cut wind resistance for trucks

    Published Mar 28, 2017
    For road vehicles, wind resistance increases fuel consumption. But one way to fight wind is with wind. Researchers in Sweden are experimenting with reducing drag on trucks with electric wind devices that mimic the way vortex generators increase lift on airplane wings.

  • Water filter from wood offers portable, eco-friendly purification in emergencies

    Published Mar 21, 2017
    What can the forests of Scandinavia possibly offer to migrants in faraway refugee camps? Clean water may be one thing.

  • New treatment attacks liver disease and type 2 diabetes

    Published Mar 02, 2017
    Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology are planning the clinical trial of a new treatment for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes which harnesses liver cells’ own ability to burn accumulated fats.

  • Heart’s hydraulics proven for the first time

    Published Mar 02, 2017
    While scientists agree that the heart relies on hydraulic forces to fill up with blood, for whatever reason these forces have never been measured – that is, until now.

  • 24 million to “New Directions in Learning Dynamical Systems”

    Published Mar 02, 2017
    In the end of February, the Swedish Research Council announced their decision regarding grants in Natural and Engineering Sciences. Four research groups from KTH received a total of 96 million SEK, and one of them is led by Håkan Hjalmarsson, professor in automatic control.

  • Closer look at atomic motion in molecules may benefit biotech researchers

    Published Feb 15, 2017
    Every molecule holds a complex landscape of moving atoms – and the ability to single out and examine individual nuclear vibrations may unlock to the secret to predicting and controlling chemical reactions. Now, a new method, developed by researchers in Sweden, enables biotech researchers to do just that.

  • New theory explains how Earth’s inner core remains solid despite extreme heat

    Published Feb 13, 2017
    Even though it is hotter than the surface of the Sun, the crystallized iron core of the Earth remains solid. A new study from KTH Royal Institute of Technology may finally settle a longstanding debate over how that’s possible, as well as why seismic waves travel at higher speeds between the planet’s poles than through the equator.

  • Silk from milk? New method binds proteins into threads

    Published Feb 08, 2017
    By all appearances, cows have little in common with spiders. Yet despite the two species’ obvious differences, new research shows that ordinary milk can be used to spin artificial silk – a breakthrough that could open new doors for alternative plastics and regenerative medicine.

  • Now drivers can hear ambulances no matter how loud their music is playing

    Published Jan 16, 2017
    If you’ve ever been startled by the sudden appearance of an ambulance while blasting music in your car, then you appreciate the value of a loud siren. Fortunately, your car is probably equipped already to receive warning signals on its audio system, thanks to a new solution developed by students at KTH.

  • With new tool, cities can plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits

    Published Jan 09, 2017
    The rollout of Sweden’s first wireless charging buses earlier this month was coupled with something the rest of the world could use – namely, a tool for cities to determine the environmental and financial benefits of introducing their own electrified bus networks.

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