Research news

  • How to stay safe online

    Published Feb 05, 2018
    Today, the 6th of February, the world celebrates Safer Internet Day. We caught up with Sonja Buchegger, associate professor in theoretical computer science, to get her best advice on staying safe in social media.

  • He discovers heart defects by using artificial intelligence

    Published Jan 25, 2018
    When, on 18 January, a judging panel, including the Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth and the Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum, announced the winner of the title Årets Studentföretagare (Student Entrepreneur of the Year) 2018, the vote fell on KTH student Max M Mohammadi. One of many factors leading to Mohammadi winning the title was his development of Heartstrings, a technique for early-stage diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases using artificial intelligence.

  • WASP wants to increase understanding of artificial intelligence in Sweden

    Published Jan 12, 2018
    During 2018 WASP will arrange a series of conferences on the team of artificial intelligence (AI). The events, called AI4X Collecting Ideas and Identifying Challenges for Future AI Research in Sweden, will be arranged five times starting the 12th of February. The goal is to enhance the understanding and knowledge of the oppertunities of AI today and in the future.

  • New organisational structure equips KTH for the future

    Published Dec 19, 2017
    On 1st January 2018, KTH will be launching a new structure which will see five schools replacing the previous ten. “We are creating a structure that will provide more efficient and clearer support for our academic excellence and better reflect KTH’s breadth and expertise,” says KTH President Sigbritt Karlsson.

  • ERC Consolidator Grants to two KTH researchers

    Published Dec 15, 2017
    Recently, the European Research Council (ERC) published the results of the 2017 call for proposals for ERC Consolidator Grants. Of the total of 14 Swedish researchers who received grants, two are from KTH Royal Institute of Technology: Dejan Kostic, Professor of Internetworking and Per Högselius, Associate Professor in the field of the History of Science, Technology and Environment.

  • Precision nanomaterials may pave new way to selectively kill cancer cells, study shows

    Published Dec 13, 2017
    Researchers from KTH have succeeded in taking the next step toward using man-made nanoscale compounds in the fight against cancer. A recent proof-of-concept study showed that dendrimers – which were first introduced in the 1980s – may be used to introduce compounds that essentially trick cancer cells into performing self-destructive tasks.

  • New way to form bioactive spider silk for medical use

    Published Dec 04, 2017
    With recent advances, technology can be used to synthesize silk with similar mechanical properties as an actual spider’s. But applying this material to promising medical therapies for illnesses such as cancer requires that humans develop a capability that only arachnids or silkworms possess – the ability to control the formation of silk.

  • Peace, equality and prosperity all depend on affordable clean energy, study shows

    Published Nov 21, 2017
    The UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals are aimed at achieving equality, securing global peace and ending extreme poverty – an ambitious agenda that will require a wide-range of conditions to be met. But one requirement lies at the center of most of the SDGs: that people have access to clean, affordable energy, says a new study co-authored by Francesco Fuso Nerini, Assistant Professor in the Division of Energy Systems Analysis at KTH.

  • Quantum secure communication is focus of new research center node

    Published Nov 21, 2017
    The future of secure communication will be in quantum encryption, and KTH will lead research in this area under the auspices of a new national research center financed by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  • Enabling robots to rethink

    Published Nov 16, 2017
    Imagine an industrial setting. A team of robots has been given the task of transporting boxes from one place to another, but (!) a truck has mistakenly put a huge delivery in front of them. An error of this kind would cause the system to halt, require human intervention and restarting. But this could soon be about to change.

  • EU testing way to use Sun to break up plastics in wastewater

    Published Nov 07, 2017
    Harnessing the Sun’s radiation to help rid the oceans of microplastic contamination is one of several technical innovations to be developed by a new EU-funded project. Beginning in November 2017, a system developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden for breaking down microplastics from personal care products will be tested for implementation in homes and wastewater treatment plants.

  • Chan Zuckerberg Initiative teams up with Swedish researchers to map all cells in human body

    Published Oct 18, 2017
    The Human Protein Atlas and Cell Atlas projects at KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) are teaming up with the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to strengthen research in cell biology and proteomics.

  • Sweden and Japan join forces on ageing population challenges

    Published Sep 27, 2017
    An advanced robot that can perform high precision surgery. Automated patient voice analysis as a method for medical diagnosis and individual treatment. Swedish and Japanese researchers can now start to work more closely together in areas like this to tackle the challenges of an ageing population.

  • An insider’s look at what goes on with proteins in a cell

    Published Sep 12, 2017
    There have been huge advances in medical science since Robert Hooke coined the term “cell” in 1665, yet the cells of the human body remain a mystery. KTH researcher Emma Lundberg is one of the scientists behind efforts to solve the puzzle of how cells work and ultimately to find new ways to treat disease.

  • Cutting-edge scientists in life sciences speak at symposium in Stockholm

    Published Sep 11, 2017
    Humanity’s origins, protein mapping and the neurobiology of the world’s deadliest animal, the mosquito, are some of the topics addressed by a group of cutting-edge scientists at a life sciences symposium in Stockholm on 15 September. The symposium is a part of the centenary celebrations of the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  • How humans develop echolocation skills is revealed in new research

    Published Sep 07, 2017
    Ongoing research at KTH reveals that when navigating by echolocation, as blind people do, our powers of hearing can be used in ways we never realized.

  • First-ever look at potentially deadly metabolic disorder that strikes infants

    Published Aug 31, 2017
    At the heart of one serious metabolic disorder is an enzyme whose inner workings and structure have been revealed for the first time by researchers at KTH.

  • Researchers are one step closer to making integrated quantum optical circuits a reality

    Published Aug 30, 2017
    KTH researchers have taken a significant step toward enabling optical quantum information processing on a chip. A new method in quantum nano photonics was published today in Nature Communications.

  • Study offers new targets for drugs against fatty liver disease and liver cancer

    Published Aug 25, 2017
    There may no silver bullet for treating liver cancer or fatty liver disease, but knowing the right targets will help science develop the most effective treatments. KTH researchers have just identified a number of drug targets that can be used in the development of new efficient treatment strategies with minimum side effects.

  • Cancer survival tied to protein levels

    Published Aug 18, 2017
    Researchers from KTH have used a big data medical study to identify genes that could help doctors predict a cancer patient’s prognosis.

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