Research news

  • Skin patch with microneedles proves effective alternative to injections

    Published Dec 12, 2016
    It’s only a matter of time before drugs are administered via patches with painless microneedles instead of unpleasant injections. But designers need to balance the need for flexible, comfortable-to-wear material with effective microneedle penetration of the skin. Researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm say they may have cracked the problem.

  • Probe offers more accurate detection of biomarker for cancer and other diseases

    Published Dec 07, 2016
    A new technique offers better sensitivity and accuracy in detecting an essential biomarker of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  • New research shows one way LED efficiency is far from optimal

    Published Nov 25, 2016
    Even though LED lights are among the most energy efficient available, there’s still plenty of room for improvement. Researchers recently found that light emitting diodes’ efficiency can be impeded by trace amounts of iron, which is a byproduct of LED production.

  • Risks with aneurysm surgery made clearer with mathematical model, researchers say

    Published Nov 10, 2016
    Even though operating on an abdominal aortic aneurysm can be risky, there are no patient-specific guidelines for deciding the optimal time for surgery. A mathematical model developed by Swedish researchers offers a way to guide doctors in making the right choices for individual patients.

  • Sensors to monitor bridges – and even enable them to tweet

    Published Oct 31, 2016
    While bridge collapses are rare, there have been enough of them to raise concerns in some parts of the world that their condition is not sufficiently monitored. Sweden is taking a hi-tech approach to its aging infrastructure. Researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm are rigging up the country’s bridges with multiple sensors that allow early detection of wear and tear. The bridges can even tweet throughout the course of a day.

  • Project receives EUR 3.2 million to explore limits of efficient computability

    Published Oct 28, 2016
    Research dealing with complex computational problems and the methods for solving them is one of the projects at KTH that recently received funding from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  • Researchers target tenfold increase in X-ray resolution

    Published Oct 25, 2016
    For all of its benefit to society, the technology we use for medical imaging is nevertheless flawed. Relevant little details go undetected due to limitations in resolution. But a recent investment in research at KTH aims to improve the picture – by at least 10 times.

  • Technique could lower cost of making bioplastics and biofuel

    Published Oct 19, 2016
    The potential for at least partly replacing oil with cellulose as a renewable source of energy and materials has just improved.

  • Low cost method for examining single leukemia cells could transform treatment

    Published Oct 14, 2016
    Leukemia is a disease in which each cell can exhibit different genetic traits, and now KTH researchers have found a cheap way to examine individual leukemia cells. Reported in Nature Communications, the breakthrough could transform leukemia treatment.

  • Nobel economics theory supports KTH research into small business financing

    Published Oct 12, 2016
    Research in contract theory, which was recognized by the Nobel Prize in Economics, is being used at KTH Royal Instiute of Technology to examine the impact of the financial crisis on small businesses.

  • Material physics work at KTH builds on Nobel laureate' discovery

    Published Oct 11, 2016
    Research that was recognized with the Nobel Prize in Physics this week has spawned an entirely new research area that could lead to super-fast quantum computers.

  • For KTH researcher, report of water vapor on Europa isn’t vindication - yet

    Published Oct 06, 2016
    The reported sighting of water plumes on Jupiter’s moon, Europa, appears to confirm observations made by KTH Royal Institute of Technology researcher Lorenz Roth three years ago. Nevertheless, the Swedish scientist remains skeptical.

  • Major investment in 'living laser'

    Published Oct 06, 2016
    Fibre optics will likely become a greater part of our lives in the years ahead, with photonic applications in such areas as medicine and solar energy. That's what KTH professor Fredrik Laurell and his colleagues will be researching with a newly-announced grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  • Ohsumi’s work enables treatments for wide range of illnesses

    Published Oct 04, 2016
    A very important discovery which paves the way for new and more effective treatments for such illnesses as Parkinson’s disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and a host of age-related disorders. That’s KTH protein technology researcher Torbjörn Gräslund’s verdict on the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Medicine to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his work on mapping of the mechanics behind cells' ability to break down and recycle their components.

  • Acclaimed researcher Joe H. Chow joins the School of Electrical Engineering

    Published Sep 23, 2016
    The EE School is happy to welcome Professor Joe H. Chow from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (NY, USA) who recently joined the department of Electric power and energy systems. During his time at KTH, he will conduct research focusing on power system modeling and simulation methods.

  • They lower the cost for surface patterning plastics

    Published Sep 14, 2016
    Researchers at the Department of Micro- and Nanosystems at KTH have developed a new way to simultaneously shape and surface treat plastic components. The new method can reduce the manufacturing cost of medical devices, such as diagnostic tools for various diseases.

  • KTH placed high in competition of cooperative and automated driving

    Published Jul 01, 2016
    During the weekend of 28 and 29 May 2016, the city of Helmond was the centre of an international event in the field of cooperative driving: the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC). Out of ten student teams from six European countries, KTH scored a place in the top three.

  • KTH team builds telescope to investigate mysterious Crab pulsar

    Published Jun 30, 2016
    In the coming days, a telescope designed and built at KTH will be launched into the stratosphere to observe the small pulsar at the centre of the spectacular Crab Nebula.

  • New national graduate school will be hub for neutron scattering research

    Published Jun 29, 2016
    KTH is one of six partner universities in a new national graduate school for neutron scattering science, which is a key part of Sweden's emergence as an international hub for this versatile area of research. The director of studies for the new school explains what it means for KTH.

  • Robots can now signal each other to lend a "hand"

    Published Jun 28, 2016
    Sometimes all it takes to get help from someone is to wave at them, or point. Now the same is true for robots. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have completed work on an EU project aimed at enabling robots to cooperate with one another on complex jobs, by using body language.

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