Skip to main content

KTH Energy Dialogue: perfect for networking

The poster exhibition held during the KTH Energy Dialogue culminated with an award ceremony in which three projects were awarded for their entries: Penetration testing and threat modeling of critical infrastructures; Carbon from biowaste and Clostridium thermocellum: making second-generation biofuels a reality.
Published Dec 03, 2021

The poster exhibition held during the KTH Energy Dialogue culminated with an award ceremony in which three projects were awarded for their entries. Prize-winners received a day of communication training at Vetenskap & Allmänhet.

Clostridium thermocellum: making second-generation biofuels a reality

Jeroen Koendjbiharie, Johannes Yayo, Teun Kuil, Antonius van Maris

“It was a total surprise to win, we didn’t expect it at all. Our entry differed from the others - there weren’t many other biologists among the exhibitors,” said Kuil.

“It’s great that it’s possible to convey what we do in a simple way that is appreciated so much that it also wins awards. Presenting your research effectively is one of the most difficult tasks as a researcher,” Koendjbiharie said.

“KTH Energy Dialogue was great. Many of the topics were fairly remote from ours, but it’s still important to gain knowledge about these areas. It’s also a good way to get an insight into the energy research conducted at KTH,” Kuil said.

Penetration testing and threat modeling of critical infrastructures

Fredrik Heiding

“There were loads of good entries this year and it’s fantastic to win. I try to find a central message that everyone can connect with. You should be able to explain your research to a 15-year-old high school student. If you can do that, you’re on to something,” Heiding said.

“The most important question for me is: how can I contribute to the energy sector? In this sense, KTH Energy Dialogue is a great place to get an overview of the needs in the sector and meet new contacts. Digitalisation is key to the development of the sector, with IT security being a top priority.”

Carbon from biowaste

Devy Kartika Ratnasari Nataila Skorodumova

“We’re trying to develop a sustainable way to produce carbon and have succeeded in developing a method using coconut shells. We’ve now developed this further to use biomass from Swedish forests, sawdust from furniture production, and garden waste,” Ratnasari said.

“I met loads of people at KTH Energy Dialogue, including a representative from Stockholm Exergi, with whom we hope to collaborate in future tests of our method. And receiving an award for our poster was a really pleasant surprise.”

The prize jury included Karin Larsdotter, KTH Sustainability, and Mario Romero, Associate Professor in Visualization at KTH.

Text: Magnus Trogen Phalén

More information

KTH Energy Dialogue 2021 articles and program