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  • Platform brings mobile connection speeds up to 100 Gbps

    Even though mobile internet link speeds might soon be 100 Gbps, this doesn’t necessarily mean network carriers will be free of data-handling challenges that effectively slow down mobile data services, for everything from individual device users to billions of internet-of-things connections.

  • Battery low? Give your mobile some water

    A power source for your mobile phone can now be as close as the nearest faucet, stream, or even a puddle, with the world’s first water-activated charging device.

  • Platform would outwit cyber criminals

    As smartphone use surges, consumers are just beginning to realise their devices are not quite as secure as they thought. A Swedish research team is working on a way to secure mobile operating systems so that consumers can be confident that their data is protected.

  • “Using your phone in the car cuts costs and pollution – and it can save lives”

    Peter Händel wants you to make your mobile phone a part of the car’s dashboard. The KTH Professor of Signal Processing has helped create a new mobile application for safer and more efficient driving. “In the public debate, drivers are often warned about using a mobile phone while driving, but I say the opposite: your mobile phone should be seen as an extension of the car’s dashboard.”

  • Disaster warner and revolution catalyst in one

    Researchers at KTH have now developed a system for wireless sharing and communication which they call Podnet. The aim has been to investigate and facilitate sporadic communication between different devices, such as mobile phones, mp3 players and tablet computers. According to Gunnar Karlsson, Professor of Communication Networks and head of Podnet, there are many areas of application for the system.

  • Battery low? Give your mobile some water

    A power source for your mobile phone can now be as close as the nearest faucet, stream, or even a puddle, with the world’s first water-activated charging device.

Belongs to: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Last changed: Sep 22, 2020