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Something I Have Learned from COVID-19

The following text was published by Marco Armiero in Environment and History 26 (3), pp. 451-454, in August 2020. Marco writes as acting president of the European Society for Environmental History (ESEH).   I hope I am not taking advantage of my position as the president of our society to write what might seem to … Continue reading “Something I Have Learned from COVID-19”

Discussing the issue of flying and sustainability

By Nina Wormbs The week before Christmas, a number of colleagues at the Division gathered for a workshop where we discussed flying habits. It was part of the research project Decreased CO2-emissions in flight-intensive organisations: from data to practice at the EECS school, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, led by Daniel Pargman with funding from … Continue reading “Discussing the issue of flying and sustainability”

Experiences in Digital Teaching

Covid-19 has profoundly changed the way we work as scholars of the humanities. Teaching is no exception to this. The digitisation of university education was abruptly maximised and teachers were to a big extent forced to adapt to the new reality of online teaching on their own. Kati Lindström has written about her experiences during … Continue reading “Experiences in Digital Teaching”

The Politics of Nuclear Waste: An Interview with Andrei Stsiapanau*

by Alicia Gutting, PhD student Nuclear energy is a highly debated field and depending on the societal context usually either embraced or fully rejected. From an outsider position it sometimes seems as if there was no in between: you are either pro- or anti-nuclear. This does not solely apply to times of active nuclear energy … Continue reading “The Politics of Nuclear Waste: An Interview with Andrei Stsiapanau*”

Corona environments and some reflections on the entanglements of the coronavirus pandemic

by Leonoor Zuiderveen Borgesius, PhD Candidate, University of Oslo   The Covid-19 pandemic testifies to the importance of understanding human relationships to the environment as entangled. This pathogen is the most recent, but certainly not the first, aggressive reminder of how overwhelmingly physical the intertwinement between environments and human bodies is. SARS-Cov-2 is a zoonosis, … Continue reading “Corona environments and some reflections on the entanglements of the coronavirus pandemic”

Cosmopolitanism in the Anthropocene (with a Postscript on the coronavirus)

By Prof. Miyase Christensen (Stockholm Univesity & Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden) This is a moderated version (see Postscript at the end) of a chapter published in “The Sage Handbook of Media & Migration” (Sage, 2020). Editors: Kevin Smets, Koen Leurs, Myria Georgiou, Saskia Witteborn & Radhika Gajjala. Introduction In early 2019 it was announced … Continue reading “Cosmopolitanism in the Anthropocene (with a Postscript on the coronavirus)”

The Creep and Leap of Knowledge: On “source criticism” and “semilingualism” as impactful ideas of the human sciences

by Linus Salö and Fredrik Bertilsson In the not-so-distant future, people in the rich parts of the world will see driverless cars, ‘smart houses’ controlled through 5G applications, and other new inventions, as part of their every-day lives. It will be evident that quite a bit of knowledge has gone into their development. Indeed, many … Continue reading “The Creep and Leap of Knowledge: On “source criticism” and “semilingualism” as impactful ideas of the human sciences”

Why everyone should watch HBO’s “Chernobyl”

by: Achim Klüppelberg, Siegfried Evens, and Johan Gärdebo (Read in Russian: Клюппельберг, Ахим – Эвенс, Зигфрид – Гердебо, Иоган – Чернобыль) 25 meters below Stockholm’s solid bedrock, HBO’s Chernobyl is being screened inside a decommissioned reactor for nuclear weapons. It is dark, a little bit chilly, and the atmosphere is tense. The thrilling music ends, … Continue reading “Why everyone should watch HBO’s “Chernobyl””

Why we need feminist posthumanities for a more-than-human world

by: Cecilia Åsberg and Marietta Radomska Today, the environment is in us, and we humans are fully in the environment. That much is clear in this new planetary era of uncertainty some call the Anthropocene. This new geological period, the environmental Age of Man, is often defined by unparalleled human disturbance of the earth’s ecosystems, … Continue reading “Why we need feminist posthumanities for a more-than-human world”

What if…? Redefining research impact from an environmental humanities perspective.

The following text has been conceived as an environmental humanities critique to research policy regarding what are considered  “research initiatives of excellence”. Authors: Irma Allen, Jesse Peterson, Daniele Valisena, Anne Gough, ENHANCE ITN – PhD Students, KTH – Environmental Humanities Laboratory, Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment What if…? Redefining research impact from … Continue reading “What if…? Redefining research impact from an environmental humanities perspective.”