The Politics of Nuclear Waste: An Interview with Andrei Stsiapanau*

by Alicia Gutting, PhD student Nuclear energy is a highly debated field and depending on the societal context usually either embraced or fully rejected. From an outsider position it sometimes seems as if there was no in between: you are either pro- or anti-nuclear. This does not solely apply to times of active nuclear energy … Continue reading “The Politics of Nuclear Waste: An Interview with Andrei Stsiapanau*”

Corona environments and some reflections on the entanglements of the coronavirus pandemic

by Leonoor Zuiderveen Borgesius, PhD Candidate, University of Oslo   The Covid-19 pandemic testifies to the importance of understanding human relationships to the environment as entangled. This pathogen is the most recent, but certainly not the first, aggressive reminder of how overwhelmingly physical the intertwinement between environments and human bodies is. SARS-Cov-2 is a zoonosis, … Continue reading “Corona environments and some reflections on the entanglements of the coronavirus pandemic”

Cosmopolitanism in the Anthropocene (with a Postscript on the coronavirus)

By Prof. Miyase Christensen (Stockholm Univesity & Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden) This is a moderated version (see Postscript at the end) of a chapter published in “The Sage Handbook of Media & Migration” (Sage, 2020). Editors: Kevin Smets, Koen Leurs, Myria Georgiou, Saskia Witteborn & Radhika Gajjala. Introduction In early 2019 it was announced … Continue reading “Cosmopolitanism in the Anthropocene (with a Postscript on the coronavirus)”

Why everyone should watch HBO’s “Chernobyl”

by: Achim Klüppelberg, Siegfried Evens, and Johan Gärdebo (Read in Russian: Клюппельберг, Ахим – Эвенс, Зигфрид – Гердебо, Йоган – Чернобыль) 25 meters below Stockholm’s solid bedrock, HBO’s Chernobyl is being screened inside a decommissioned reactor for nuclear weapons. It is dark, a little bit chilly, and the atmosphere is tense. The thrilling music ends, … Continue reading “Why everyone should watch HBO’s “Chernobyl””

Why we need feminist posthumanities for a more-than-human world

by: Cecilia Åsberg and Marietta Radomska Today, the environment is in us, and we humans are fully in the environment. That much is clear in this new planetary era of uncertainty some call the Anthropocene. This new geological period, the environmental Age of Man, is often defined by unparalleled human disturbance of the earth’s ecosystems, … Continue reading “Why we need feminist posthumanities for a more-than-human world”