MJ2380 Introduction to Energy Systems Analysis and Applications 9.0 credits

Introduktion till Energisystemanalys och tillämpning

  • Education cycle

    Second cycle
  • Main field of study

    Mechanical Engineering
  • Grading scale

    A, B, C, D, E, FX, F

Course offerings

Spring 19 for programme students

  • Periods

    Spring 19 P3 (9.0 credits)

  • Application code

    60650

  • Start date

    15/01/2019

  • End date

    15/03/2019

  • Language of instruction

    English

  • Campus

    KTH Campus

  • Tutoring time

    Daytime

  • Form of study

    Normal

  • Number of places

    No limitation

  • Schedule

    Schedule (new window)

  • Course responsible

    Francesco Gardumi <gardumi@kth.se>

    Mark Howells <mark.howells@energy.kth.se>

    Youssef Almulla <almulla@kth.se>

  • Target group

    Optional course. TSUEM1 och CMAST3, CDEPR3, CMATD3 som ska inrikta sig mot TSUEM.

    Conditionally elective for CENMI3

    CMAST4, CDEPR4 course within technical profile

Spring 20 for programme students

  • Periods

    Spring 20 P3 (9.0 credits)

  • Application code

    61040

  • Start date

    15/01/2020

  • End date

    14/03/2020

  • Language of instruction

    English

  • Campus

    KTH Campus

  • Tutoring time

    Daytime

  • Form of study

    Normal

  • Number of places

    No limitation

  • Course responsible

    Mark Howells <mark.howells@energy.kth.se>

  • Target group

    Elective course. TSUEM1 och CMAST3, CDEPR3, CMATD3 som ska inrikta sig mot TSUEM.

    Conditionally elective for CENMI3

    CMAST4, CDEPR4 course within technical profile

Intended learning outcomes

The student should be able:

  • to apply relevant energy systems models in to analyses typical stylized policy and technology assessment problems , within the main area, to a given problem
  • given limited and uncertain information, independently analyze various energy system situations and appropriately distill insights
  • reflect on, evaluate and critically assess the limits of standard energy systems approaches and their ‘real-world’ usefulness
  • be able to identify specific areas of improvement needed in the field of energy systems analysis
  • undertake a thorough and detailed simulation of an energy systems analysis case study, including independent data gathering, problem definition, model choice, solution and interpretation

Course main content

1. The process of 3E modeling:

  • Why model?
  • The role of scenarios and assumptions (forecasting, back casting etc…) and the importance of transparency
  • Relationship between modeling and action (policy / investment formulation / technology development)

Examples of ‘good practice’ including stakeholder communication, etc.

Information flows between and organization of:

- technology characterization and data collection efforts,

- the modeling analysis

- stakeholders

decision / policy makers

  • Where does modeling fit?
  • Developing economically / thermodynamically / physically consistent scenarios.
  • Short, medium and long term analysis and the role thereof
  • Single / multi-comodity (e.g. power system expansion vs the water-food-energy nexus)
  • Small scale (with a village electrification) vs large (global energy assessments)
  • Socio-economic vs physical focus (e.g. welfare maximization vs resource efficiency)

2. Modeling - types and tools

Number crunching / thought experiment practice (how-to)

  • Defining the questions
  • The best approach given data, modeling and other constraints

application (examples)

  • A series of small spreadsheet model examples of stereo-types (the student will be expected to build these simple models with guidance)

Demand projections
(based on GDP, population, output projections * service intensities * appliance/equipment efficiency etc)

- Energy service to supply analysis with emissions. 1staccounting, then cost optimal, then multi-objective.

- Input-Output economic model with energy system representation

- CGE model with energy system representation

- Econometric model with price response

- A multi-resource (Climate, Land, Energy and Water CLEW) model

- Assessment of the information requirements, model scope and outputs: especially with regard to limitations.

3. Policy, technology, economic and other questions:

  • How they have technology and policy assessments (typically) been modeled? (With illustrative standard examples: Investment portfolios, technology R&D programs, RE and EE standards, energy security, GHG mitigation cost curves etc.)
  • Technology and system characterization:

- Resource characterization

- Transformation

- End-use and services

- Conventional technologies

- Technologies and dispatching:

- Variable and intermittent generation; Storage; Hydro; Demand response and smart grids

- Interaction with the macro-economy

- Interaction with the environment and other resource systems (materials, water, etc)

- System integration and hybridization

 Strengths and insights to be gained by different models, scenarios and processes (i.e. a

CGE gives economy wide insights, but limited technology deployment information

 An accounting framework is useful for reconciling differing non-optimal views, but not good at developing ‘best fit’ trade-offs  Etc…)

4. An introduction to selected ‘off the shelf tools’

OSeMOSYS introduction:

  • Introduction and aim
  • Standard cost minimizing application
  • Applications that developing new functionality

Other tools:

- TBD.

Eligibility

Technical undergraduate degree with introductory mathematics and economics or equivalent

Literature

Examination

  • PRO1 - Project 1, 1.5, grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F
  • PRO2 - Project 2, 1.5, grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F
  • PRO3 - Project 3, 1.5, grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F
  • PRO4 - Project 4, 1.5, grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F
  • PRO5 - Project 5, 3.0, grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F

4*1,5 credit projects and 1*3 credit project

Requirements for final grade

To pass

4*1,5 credit projects and 1*3 credit project

Offered by

ITM/Energy Technology

Examiner

Mark Howells <mark.howells@energy.kth.se>

Version

Course syllabus valid from: Spring 2012.
Examination information valid from: Spring 2012.