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Understanding the risk for groundwater sources in areas with unsewered sanitation services from the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater

There is no evidence, that SARS-CoV-2 is likely to become inactivated similar to non-enveloped human enteric viruses. Although the transport in subsurface dissents, this project aims to study the potential risks of the mobility and impact of SARS-CoV-2 in groundwater sources in areas with unsewered/unimproved or limited sanitation services.

Project name: Understanding the risk for groundwater sources in areas with unsewered sanitation services from the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater
Project leader: Prosun Bhattacharya, David Nilsson, Md Tahmidul Islam, Md Ahasan Habib, Julian Ijumulana, Regina Filemon Irunde
Participating universities/companies/other organisations: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, ExcelDots, Ramböll, Stockholm University, SVO; IIT Gandhinagar, India; NGO Forum for Public Health, University of Dhaka, Unicef, ICDDRB, DPHE, Dhaka WASA, Bangladesh; University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Project period: 2020
Financing: KTH Research Platform: Life Science Technology

Studies have indicated that coronavirus survived only 2 days in dechlorinated tap water and hospital wastewater at 20 degree Celsius. There are indications that the inactivation rate of viruses is the single most important factor governing virus transport and fate in the subsurface. It is important to understand spatial processes through which the virus can enter groundwater systems in urban settings with poor wastewater management systems. This study aims at investigating hydrological, hydrogeological and geological processes potential for controlling transport of SARS-CoV-2 into groundwater systems.

Small towns/municipalities with a population less than 15 000 inhabitants in Sweden who are not covered by the municipal services. People from Central and Southern Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa regions are still defecating in the open and mostly have unsewered/unimproved and limited sanitation services, moreover people from the urban slums will be benefited.

Contact

MD Tahmidul Islam
MD Tahmidul Islam
Page responsible:infomaster@abe.kth.se
Belongs to: Sustainable development, environmental science and engineering (SEED)
Last changed: Jun 16, 2020