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AK2038 Theory and Methodology of Science with Applications (Social Science) 7.5 credits

Course memo Autumn 2023-50049

Version 3 – 09/21/2023, 2:59:25 PM

Course offering

Period 1 (Start date 28 Aug 2023, English)

Language Of Instruction

English

Offered By

ABE/Philosophy

Course memo Autumn 2023

Headings denoted with an asterisk ( * ) is retrieved from the course syllabus version Autumn 2022

Content and learning outcomes

Course contents

The following is an incomplete list of topics covered in the course.

  • Scientific knowledge
  • Definitions
  • Hypothesis testing
  • Observations and measurements
  • Experiments
  • Models
  • Statistical reasoning
  • Causes and explanations
  • Qualitative methods
  • Economic methodology
  • Risk and decisions of risks
  • Research ethics

Intended learning outcomes

After having completed the course, the student should, with regards to the theory and methodology of science, both orally as well as in writing, be able to:

  • Identify definitions and descriptions of concepts, theories and problem areas, as well as identify the correct application of these concepts and theories.
  • Account for concepts, theories and general problem areas, as well as apply concepts and theories to specific cases.
  • Critically discuss the definitions and applications of concepts and theories as they applies to specific cases of scientific research.

These learning objectives are examined in writing via a digital exam and orally via seminars. 

  • Summarize and present research reports or scientific articles in an accessible way intended for receivers who lack expert knowledge.
  •  Account for structural, standard, and qualitative criteria for scientific writing and apply these criteria on research reports and scientific articles.
  •  Identify and critically discuss specific theoretical and methodological problems in research reports or scientific articles.

These learning objectives are examined in writing via a project work.

Learning activities

Below follows an outline of the course learning activities. Detailed descriptions of the learning activities are found in later sections in this course memo. 

  • One lecture on campus: Introduction and Scientific Knowledge.
  • Ten pre-recorded video lectures. Each video lecture has an associated voluntary lecture quiz and a text transcription. Video lectures are included in the TimeEdit course schedule as a planning recommendation but can be viewed throughout the course. Video lecture quizzes however, have deadlines.
  • Two flipped classroom sessions on campus related to a subset of the video lectures. Before each flipped classroom session, you post a question related to the relevant video lectures on a discussion board and upvote questions posted by other students that you wish to be discussed on the flipped classroom sessions. The lecturer selects among the questions and answers these during the flipped classroom sessions. 
  • Four seminars on campus. Each seminar covers selected course contents from the video lectures and course readings. Before attending each seminar, you complete a mandatory seminar preparation quiz. On the seminar you work on group exercises and discussions. You take one seminar per seminar week.
  • A project work which includes essay submissions, peer-feedback submissions and one project seminar. Step by step you will learn both how to popularize the content of a scientific article in your field of study, and to use the course concepts to point out methodological strengths and weaknesses. The final end product is an essay you write with other people from the course.
  • Three exercise sessions on campus. 

Detailed plan

Lectures 

This course includes eleven lectures. Lecture 1 is held on campus and lectures 2-11 are available as videos via Canvas and can be viewed at any time during the course. The placement of video lectures in the TimeEdit course schedule is a planning suggestion for when you might view them.  

Each of the video lectures has an associated lecture quiz with a deadline. If you complete lecture quizzes with passing score upon the deadline, you receive course bonus points for the exam (see section on Schedule and see Canvas for quiz deadlines). For more information on bonus points, see section on Bonus point system below. 

  1. Introduction and scientific knowledge (campus lecture), course week 1
  2. Scientific inferences (59 minutes) (flipped classroom 1), course week 1
  3. Observation and measurement (76 minutes) (flipped cl. 1), course week 2
  4. Experiments (49 minutes) (flipped classroom 2), course week 2
  5. Models (62 minutes) (flipped classroom 2), course week 3
  6. Statistics (62 minutes), course week 3
  7. Explanations and causes (81 minutes), course week 4
  8. Economic methodology (95 minutes), course week 5
  9. Qualitative methods (93 minutes), course week 5
  10. Research ethics (103 minutes), course week 6
  11. Anticipating risk in science and engineering (85 minutes), course week 6 

Flipped classrooms 

Flipped classroom sessions function as an opportunity for receiving clarification from the lecturer on lecture contents. The flipped classroom sessions are intended for addressing questions on course topics that students find unclear, challenging or otherwise interesting.  

There are two flipped classroom sessions on campus, each based on two video lectures. Flipped classroom 1 focuses on the lectures on scientific inferences (lecture 2), and on observation and measurement (lecture 3). Flipped classroom 2 focuses on the lectures on experiments (lecture 4) and on models (lecture 5).  

Each flipped classroom session has an associated discussion board. Before each flipped classroom session, you post a question for the lecturer on the board related to the relevant video lectures, and you upvote questions posted by other students that you would like the lecturer to address during the session. See section on Schedule and see Canvas for further instructions and deadlines. 

The lecturer selects a set of questions from the discussion board and devotes the flipped classroom sessions to answering these questions. During the sessions, you will also be invited to participate on voluntary exercise activities.  

If you complete the flipped classroom activities, you receive course bonus points for the exam. For more information on bonus points, see section on Bonus point system below.  

It is possible to attend flipped classroom sessions without having posted on the discussion board and without participating on exercises in the classroom, but this will yield no bonus points. 

The flipped classroom sessions are taken together with students from other, similar courses. 

Bonus point system 

Completing video lecture quizzes with a passing score, as well as posting on the flipped classroom discussion boards together with participating on the classroom activities, gives course bonus points for the exam. Bonus point activities are voluntary, optional activities intended at incentivising students to engage with the course contents continuously throughout the course. 

Each video lecture has an associated video lecture quiz, comprised of 15 questions. If you complete a quiz with a 14 point score or higher, you get 0.5 course bonus points. All video lecture quizzes have deadlines (See section on Schedule and see Canvas for deadlines). There is no limit on number of attempts up until the quiz deadlines. 

Course bonus points can also be awarded for the two flipped classrooms. Attending the flipped classroom session and carrying out tasks as per instructed by the lecturer results in 0.5 bonus points per each of the two flipped classrooms. 

In order to make the number of bonus points fit the exam format, course bonus points are scaled in the following way before the exam (C = course bonus points, E = exam bonus points): E = C * 5/6, rounded up to the closest .5-value. Example: 4.5 course bonus points will be scaled as 4.5 * 5/6 = 3.75, then rounded up to 4 exam points. You can maximally obtain 5 exam bonus points.  

Exam bonus points are added to part 1 of the exam. For example, if part 1 has a maximum score of 15 points, then 3.5 exam bonus points plus 10 points on part 1 results in a total score of 13.5 points on part 1 of the exam. 4 exam bonus points plus 13 points on part 1 results in a total score of 15 points on part 1 of the exam. 

For more information about the exam, see section on Examination and completion. 

Bonus points collected during one and the same course period are valid for, and only for, the scheduled exam and the corresponding re-exam for that period. 

Seminars 

The course includes a mandatory seminar series comprised of four seminars. Each seminar covers selected course contents from the video lectures and course readings, and following the first seminar, each subsequent seminar connects to the previous seminars. Seminars are intended as a collaborative learning activity where you practice critically discussing course contents and practice applying course contents to cases, with instruction and support from teaching staff. The overall topics covered during the seminar series are as follows: 

  1. Definitions, operationalizations and hypotheses (course week 3)
  2. Designing a scientific study (course week 4)
  3. Interpretation, analysis and evidence and philosophy of social science (course week 6)
  4. Risk and research ethics (course week 7). 

Since completion of the seminar series yields course credits, the seminars feature mandatory activities: (1) preparing and passing a seminar quiz, and (2) actively participating on the seminar. Missing activities result in seminar incompletion and thus no seminar course credits. 

Before each seminar, you read the assigned readings (reading instructions available on Canvas). Before attending each seminar, you must also pass a mandatory seminar preparation quiz (See section on Schedule and see Canvas for deadlines). There is no limit on number of quiz attempts up until the quiz deadline. You must complete the quiz with a passing score of 14 points before the deadline (indicated in Canvas as “Passed”).  

The preparation quizzes are intended to ensure that all participants come prepared to the seminar for a more rewarding seminar learning experience. If you attend the seminar without completing the preparation quiz beforehand, you will not be marked as attending.  

On the seminar, you will be working together with other students on exercises as per instructed by the teacher. The exercises are formulated in such a way as to promote critical reflection and discussion, as well as to practice application of course concepts to case scenarios.  

You are expected to engage actively with the course contents and work on the exercises during the seminar. Passive attendance on the seminar will be marked as not attending. Active participation on the seminar does not mean that you are expected to demonstrate full proficiency of course contents. Rather, it means that you are expected to have properly engaged with the relevant course material beforehand and made an honest attempt at understanding it. Arisen questions and reflections can be addressed on the seminar. 

For information on what to do if you have not completed a preparation quiz or actively attended on a seminar, see the section on Examination and completion. 

Seminar contents and reading instructions. All the texts can be found on Canvas. 

Seminar 1 – Definitions, operationalizations and hypotheses. 

Texts: 

  • Grüne-Yanoff, Till – Justified Method Choice, chapters 1, 2, 3, 13 
  • Optional reading: Hansson, Sven Ove – Art of Doing Science: sections 2.2-2.8, 3.1-3.2, 5.0-5.1, and 5.8 

Topics relevant for the seminar:

  • Stipulative and lexical definitions 
  • Narrowness and broadness (as applied to definitions) 
  • Vagueness 
  • Hypotheses (and their quality criteria)
  • Direct, aided and indirect observation
  • Operationalization
  • Accuracy and precision (as qualities of observations and measurements)
  • Measurement error (random and systematic error)
  • Convergent validity and divergent validity 

Seminar 2 – Designing a scientific study. 

Texts: 

  • Grüne-Yanoff, Till – Justified Method Choice, chapters 4, 5. 
  • Optional reading: Hansson, Sven Ove – Art of Doing Science: sections 3.7, 4.2-4, and 5.1-3. 

Topics relevant for the seminar:

  • Experiment, observational studies and model studies 
  • Mill’s method of difference 
  • Internal validity and external validity 
  • Experimental control 
  • Constancy, elimination and effect separation
  • Randomization
  • Control group and treatment group
  • Observer influence
  • Confirmation bias
  • Blinding
  • Epistemic virtues of models (Parameter precision, Similarity, Robustness, Simplicity, Tractability, Transparency) 
  • Analogies (positive, negative, neutral) 

Seminar 3: Interpretation, analysis and evidence. 

Texts: 

  • Grüne-Yanoff, Till – Justified Method Choice: chapters 2, 6, 7.
  • Optional reading: Hansson, Sven Ove – Art of Doing Science: sections 1.6-7, 3.7, 3.9, 5.3-5, 5.7, 7, 8 and the box on p. 24. 

Topics relevant for the seminar:

  • Repeatability, reproducibility and replicability 
  • Statistical evaluation
  • Statistical significance
  • Correlation and causality
  • Explanatory virtues (Accuracy [of explanations], Non-sensitivity, Precision in the explanans, Precision of the explanandum, Cognitive salience)
  • Duhem-Quine thesis
  • Ad-hoc hypothesis
  • Falsificationism (Popper)
  • Inductive and deductive inferences 

Seminar 4: Risk and research ethics. 

Texts: 

  • Grüne-Yanoff, Till – Justified Method Choice, chapters 8, 9, 11, 12.
  • “On Being a Scientist: Responsible Conduct in Research”, National academy of Sciences.
  • Ahlin, Jesper, “Ethical Thinking”.
  • Optional reading: Hansson, Sven Ove - Art of Doing Science: Section 9. 

Topics relevant for the seminar: 

  • Functions (assigned and ascribed)
  • The design process
  • Qualitative data
  • Controlling observer effects
  • Case study
  • Gift authorship and ghost authorship
  • Scientific misconduct (falsification, fabrication and plagiarism)
  • Informed consent
  • Deontology, consequentialism and virtue ethics
  • Precautionary principle
  • Decision making (under certainty/risk/ignorance/deep uncertainty) 

Project, 3 credits

This part is called “Science communication and evaluation”. In this part you will work with a published scientific article from your field of study. This article will be available on Canvas about a week after the start of the course. The project is introduced in a video lecture and then consists of three blocks. 

  1. Block 1: Popularizing a concept from the article. 
  1. Block 2: Discussing one methodological strength and one weakness of the study described in the article. 
  1. Block 3: An essay, popularizing the entire article as well as discussing all methodological strengths and weaknesses of the study described in the article. 

In each block you will peer-review another student’s submission. For each block there is a submission deadline and a peer review deadline. For block 3, there is also a final submission. The submissions are graded pass, revise or fail. Failing any task means failing the entire project part. If you fail the project part, you will have to do the project part anew in another period to complete the course. 

Your submissions will be graded after the peer review period. If the submission is not good enough to pass but still shows clear promise, you will be asked to revise. Your peer reviews are also graded, and if your peer review does not fulfil the requirements, you will be asked to revise. 

Blocks 1 and 2 are done individually. Block 3 is done together with other students from your masters’ programme. You will be divided into groups after the deadline of Block 1. If there are too few from your master’s programme to form a group, you will complete block 3 as an individual assignment. 

In the first week of the course, it is highly recommended that you watch the project part information video lecture. In this lecture, Till Grüne-Yanoff explains the general structure of this version of the project part, what is required of a student attending the project part, and of the submitted assignments. The lecture will also explain how scientific content can be presented to a general audience in a popularized way, and how a critical evaluation of methodological aspects can be performed and presented. Finally, the lecture contains information on how to provide peer feedback. 

After having watched the information lecture, you are to read a scientific article assigned to your master program and start working on the tasks (the articles can be found on the TaMoS course page). Download the one that is named after your master program. Contact us if no satisfactory article can be found.

Group work and students without a group. Block 3 is to be completed in a small group with people from your master program. We will assign you to a group after Block 2 (Task A) is completed. Some master programs only have one or two students taking the course in a given period. Those students might be assigned to a temporary group after Block 2 (Task A) is completed, but work without a group in Block 3. If you are a student without a group, you perform the tasks in Block 1 in the same way as everyone else. After Block 2 (Task A) you will be assigned to a group of 3-5 other students without a group. You will then do the tasks in Block 2, Task B in much the same way as everyone else. In Block 3, you write your own, individual, complete text. The individual assignment has a lower minimum requirement on word count than the group assignment for Block 3. You will then give peer feedback submissions other students without a project group. Note that you have different submission pages for Block 3.

Schedule and Deadlines. Here is the schedule and deadlines for the project part. For a specific deadline of a project-part assignment, look on the information page on Canvas. 

Project Part Introduction Video Lecture – Course week 1 

Block 1: 

Deadline Task A – Course week 2 
Deadline Task B – Course week 3 

Block 2: 

Deadline task A – Course week 4 
Deadline task B – Course week 5 

Block 3: 

Deadline Task A - Group Work – Course week 6 
Deadline Task A - Individual assignment – Course week 6 
Deadline Task B - Group Work – Course week 7 
Deadline Task B - Individual assignment – Course week 7 
Deadline Task C Final Submission - Group Work – Course week 8 
Deadline Task C Final Submission - Individual assignment – Course week 8 

Plagiarism. All texts are automatically checked for plagiarism, and high scores are then manually checked. If we after this suspect plagiarism, we are obliged to report this to the disciplinary committee. All sources should be stated using any standard referencing system (see the KTH library). Citations should be marked with citation marks - " " - and the source provided. As a simple rule, consider five words or more directly from a source a citation. To avoid plagiarism charges, a tip is to make notes when reading a text, and write your assignment by looking at your notes instead of the text. It is allowed to re-use material in Block 3, which you already submitted in Block 1 or Block 2, but since this will be automatically flagged as plagiarism please note what material is being re-used in your text, to make the manual plagiarism check easier. 

Article list for Project Part for AK2038 - Science Communication and Evaluation. Here are the articles for the project part (does not apply to TTMAM, TMTHM, TMAKM). Download the one that is named after your master program. Haven't started a master program yet? Choose the article of the program that you plan on taking. Is your master program missing? Take a look at the online article list on canvas (which is the most updated). Cannot find it there either?  Pick an article that you think you can work with. Cannot find an article you think you can work with? Send us an e-mail (see Contact information). 

  

Code 

Master Program 

Article 

TAEEM 

Aerospace Engineering 

TAEEM Babinsky H, 2003, How Does Wings Work 

TELPM 

Electric Power Engineering 

TELPM Baraco M, 2010, Experimental Comparison between two Fault–Tolerant Fractional–Slot Multiphase PM Motor Drives 

TFOBM 

Real Estate and Construction Management 

TFOBM Kwabena Asiama et al 2017 In the Land of the Dammed Assessing Governance Resettlement of Ghana’s Bui Dam Project 

Or 

TFOBM Market rents and economic segregation – Lind & Hellström 

TFORM 

Vehicle Engineering 

TFORM Dheeraj 2016, Experimental investigation on latent heat thermal energy storage system 

TINNM 

TIDTM 

Information and Network Engineering 
 
Sports Technology 

TINNM & TIDTM Sharma, Manish, et al. 2017 Wearable motion sensor based phasic analysis of tennis serve for performance feedback 

TIPUM 

Engineering Design 

TIPUM Cho S Eppinger SD, 2005, A simulation-based process model for managing complex design projects 

TMBIM 

Medical Biotechnology 

TMBIM Surin B et al, 2013, LG3 fragment of endorepellin is a possible biomarker of severity in IgA nephropathy 

TMHIM 

TEESM 

Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Infrastructure  

TMHIM Xian G et al, 2007, An analysis of urban development and its environmental impact on the Tampa Bay watershed 

TMMMM 

Macromolecular Materials 

TMMMM Ioelovich M Leykin A, 2009, Accessibility and supermolecular structure of cellulose 

TMVTM 

Molecular Science and Engineering 

TMVTM Hedberg J et al, 2012, Interactions between surfactants and silver nanoparticles of varying charge 

TNTEM 

Nanotechnology 

TNTEM Wang G et al, 2011, Enhanced capacitance in partially exfoliated multi-walled carbon nanotubes 

TSCRM 

Systems, Control and Robotics 

TSCRM Raul Mur-Artal 2017 ORB-SLAM2 an Open-Source SLAM System for Monocular, Stereo and RGB-D Cameras 

TTMVM 

Engineering Materials Science 

TTMVM Walbrühl et al 2017 ICME guided modeling of surface gradient formation in cemented carbides 

TIVNM 

ICT innovation 

TIVNM Gupta Et al, Direct Manipulation in Tactive Displays, 2016 

TIMBM 

Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology 

TIMBM Rodolfi L et al, 2008, Microalgae for Oil Strain Selection, Induction of Lipid Synthesis and Outdoor Mass Cultivation in a Low-Cost Photobioreactor 

TCAEM 

Civil and Architectural Engineering Master 

TCAEM Lim Y et al, 2012, Building facade design for daylighting quality in a typical government office building 

TKEMM 

Chemical Engineering for Energy and Environment 

TKEMM Rios LE et al, 2013, Use of Surfactants and Blends to Remove DDT from Contaminated Soils 

TMLEM 

Medical Engineering 

TMLEM Peolsson M, 2008, A pilot study using Tissue Velocity Ultrasound Imaging (TVI) to assess muscle activity pattern in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia 

TTGTM 

Transport and Geoinformation 

TTGTM Taylor MAP, 2012, Remoteness andaccessibility in the vulnerability analysis of regional road networks 

TMRSM 

Naval Architecture 

TMRSM Stenius I et al, 2007, Explicit FE - Modelling of Hydroelasticity in Panel-Water Impacts 

TJVTM 

Railway Engineering 

TJVTM Orvnäs A et al, 2010, Ride Comfort Improvements in a High-Speed Train with Active Secondary Suspension 

TEBSM 

Embedded Systems 

TEBSM Hayes J Efros A, 2007, Scene completion using millions of photographs 

TELFM 
 
TEFRM 

Electrophysics 

Electromagnetics, Fusion and Space Engineering 

TELFM & TEFRM First results of movable limiter experiments and its effects on the tokamak plasma confinement 

TIDTM 

Sports Technology 

TINNM Sharma, Manish, et al. 2017 Wearable motion sensor based phasic analysis of tennis serve for performance feedback 

TINEM 

Industrial Management 

TINEM Christian Arnold et al. 2016 How the Industrial Internet of Things changes Business Models 

TTMIM 

Transport, Mobility and Innovation 

TTMIM Mooney et al 2019 - Freedom from the station - spatial equity in access to dockless bike share 

List of master programs and their abbreviations. Cannot find your master program? Check out the online list on canvas (which is the most updated). Cannot find it there either? Go to KTH.se and find it or send us an email. 

Aerospace Engineering (TAEEM, 120 credits) 

Applied and Computational Mathematics (TTMAM, 120 credits) 

Architecture (TARKM, 120 credits) 

Chemical Engineering for Energy and Environment (TKEMM, 120 credits) 

Civil and Architectural Engineering (TCAEM, 120 credits) 

Communication Systems (TCOMM, 120 credits) 

Computer Science (TCSCM, 120 credits) 

Computer Simulations for Science and Engineering (TDTNM, 120 credits) 

Economics of Innovation and Growth (TEINM, 120 credits) 

Electric Power Engineering (TELPM, 120 credits) 

Electromagnetics, Fusion and Space Engineering (TEFRM, 120 credits) 

Embedded Systems (TEBSM, 120 credits) 

Energy Innovation (TIETM, 120 credits) 

Engineering Design (TIPUM, 120 credits) 

Engineering Materials Science (TTMVM, 120 credits) 

Engineering Mechanics (TTEMM, 120 credits) 

Engineering Physics (TTFYM, 120 credits) 

Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Infrastructure (TMHIM, 120 credits) 

Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems (TMESM, 120 credits) 

ICT Innovation (TIVNM, 120 credits) 

Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology (TIMBM, 120 credits) 

Industrial Engineering and Management (TIEMM, 120 credits) 

Industrial Management (TINEM, 120 credits) 

Information and Network Engineering (TINNM, 120 credits) 

Innovative Sustainable Energy Engineering (TIEEM, 120 credits) 

Integrated Product Design (TIPDM, 120 credits) 

Interactive Media Technology (TIMTM, 120 credits) 

Machine Learning (TMAIM, 120 credits) 

Macromolecular Materials (TMMMM, 120 credits) 

Management and Engineering of Environment and Engineering (TEEEM, 120 credits) 

Maritime Engineering (TMEGM, 120 credits) 

Mathematics (TMAKM, 120 credits) 

Media Management (TMMTM, 120 credits) 

Medical Biotechnology (TMBIM, 120 credits) 

Medical Engineering (TMLEM, 120 credits) 

Molecular Science and Engineering (TMVTM, 120 credits) 

Molecular Techniques in Life Science (TMTLM, 120 credits) 

Nanotechnology (TNTEM, 120 credits) 

Naval Architecture (TMRSM, 120 credits) 

Nuclear Energy Engineering (TNEEM, 120 credits) 

Production Engineering and Management (TPRMM, 120 credits) 

Railway Engineering, 120 credits, admitted/batch from autumn 16 (TJVTM, 120 credits) 

Real Estate and Construction Management (TFOBM, 120 credits) 

Software Engineering of Distributed Systems (TSEDM, 120 credits) 

Sustainable Energy Engineering (TSUEM, 120 credits) 

Sustainable Technology (TSUTM, 120 credits) 

Sustainable Urban Planning and Design (THSSM, 120 credits) 

Systems, Control and Robotics (TSCRM, 120 credits) 

Technology, Work and Health (TTAHM, 120 credits) 

Transport and Geoinformation Technology (TTGTM, 120 credits) 

Turbomachinery Aeromechanic University Training (TAETM, 120 credits) 

Vehicle Engineering (TFORM, 120 credits) 

Master's Programme,Sustainable Production Development (TITHM, 120 credits) 

 

Exercise sessions 

The exercise sessions are extra opportunities to practice on the course content. They are held on campus and shared with other course codes. They are voluntary and have no associated submissions. The format is tested for the first time this semester. More information will follow on Canvas. 

Expected workload 

AK2038 = Expected workload is calculated based on number of course credits per period.  

7.5 ECTS one period: 20 h /week 

Schedule

The course schedule is available in TimeEdit via www.kth.se/schema. To find your schedule, log in and choose "Course" in the drop-down menu and search for your course code. Note that this schedule does not include submission deadlines, nor seminar group schedule. The TimeEdit course schedule displays all seminar slots. The seminar group schedule with one slot per group will be determined after student group sign-up upon course start. Instructions for sign-up and group schedule will be available on Canvas.  

Your course shares seminars with other courses on theory and methodology of science. If you have scheduling issues, there may be other sessions that you could attend. Contact your course coordinator if you wish to attend another seminar slot. 

Overall information on project part submission deadlines, seminar preparation quiz deadlines, video lecture quiz deadlines, and deadlines for posting questions before flipped classroom sessions can be found in this document. The exact dates and times for submission deadlines are available on Canvas. 

Seminar preparation quizzes (mandatory) 

Seminar preparation quizzes open Monday the week before each respective seminar. You must pass the quiz before attending your scheduled seminar. Seminar group schedule is determined after course start and made available on Canvas. See general course schedule in TimeEdit for all seminar slots.  

Video lecture quizzes 

All video lecture quizzes open on the Monday the week before the scheduling of a given lecture and close on the Friday the week after the scheduling of the lecture. 

Flipped classroom question posting 

Deadline for posting and upvoting questions on the discussion boards are: 

Flipped classroom session 1: 2 workday before the scheduled session. 

Flipped classroom session 2: 3 workday before the scheduled session. 

Preparations before course start

Literature

The main text for the course is: 

  • Justified Method Choice - Scientific Methodology for Scientists and Engineers by Till Grüne-Yanoff. Based on the video lectures. 

In addition, there are three supplemental texts: 

  • On Being a Scientist: Responsible Conduct in Research, which is an excerpt from a text by the National Academy of Sciences.
  • Ethical Thinking by Jesper Ahlin. 

Finally, there is one additional optional text, mainly targeting the same topics as the main course text: 

  • The Art of Doing Science by Sven Ove Hansson. 

In addition to above mentioned readings, you may be asked to read short texts in preparation for some seminars. All course readings will be available in pdf file format on Canvas together with associated reading instructions. The readings cannot be bought as physical books, but you are welcome to print them. 

Advice from previous students

In course evaluations for previous periods, students wanted to pass on the following advice. 

  • This course is different from many other courses in an engineering degree, and often requires a slightly different approach.
  • It is a good idea to follow along with the course structure, such as watching lectures when they are scheduled and completing the quizzes.
  • Taking time to prepare for the seminars and actively engaging in the seminars makes it much easier to understand the course concepts and pass the exam.
  • Watch the lectures and do the quizzes every week, not necessarily to get the points for the exam (although that's a really nice bonus) but because it really helps you learn. 

Examination and completion

Grading scale

A, B, C, D, E, FX, F

Examination

  • PRO1 - Project, 3.0 credits, Grading scale: P, F
  • SEM1 - Seminars, 1.5 credits, Grading scale: P, F
  • TEN1 - Examination, 3.0 credits, Grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F

Based on recommendation from KTH’s coordinator for disabilities, the examiner will decide how to adapt an examination for students with documented disability.

The examiner may apply another examination format when re-examining individual students.

TEN1 is examined via a digital exam. 

The section below is not retrieved from the course syllabus:

PRO1 - Project, 3.0 credits 

Three essay submissions and peer feedback. The final version of the essay is graded by a senior teacher. This essay can be passed, failed or you might be asked to revise to reach the criteria for passing. Once your final version is passed, you get the grade P. 

SEM1 - Seminars, 1.5 credits

There are four seminars, all mandatory. To pass a seminar you need to: 

  • read the required material 
  • watch the required videos 
  • pass a seminar quiz 
  • actively participate in the seminar 

The seminar module is graded P/F. If you have passed all seminars, you get the grade P. 

TEN1 - Examination, 3.0 credits

The examination is based on the lectures and the seminars, as well as the course literature. It is given on the date and time indicated in the schedule. It consists of three parts. The first part is a multiple-choice part asking you to identify the definitions and applications of course concepts. The second part is an essay part where you are to submit written answers to two problems. In this part you are asked to account for the course concepts. The third part is an essay part where you choose one out of a list of problems, which require you to account for, apply and discuss course concepts to show skills equivalent to the grade levels B and A. This part is only corrected if the student passes parts 1&2. The exam is open-book, which means that one is allowed to use the course literature when answering the questions. During the course there are quizzes and flipped classroom sessions where students can collect bonus points. The bonus points are scaled to fit the exam format: maximum five points. The points are then added to the part 1 exam score, capped at the maximum for that part. Bonus points are valid for the exam and re-exam belonging to the period and year when they were collected. One may collect points valid for another exam by re-registering for that period and re-taking the quizzes. 

Other requirements for final grade

Fullfilled seminar requirements, project requirements and written exam.

Opportunity to complete the requirements via supplementary examination

A student may request a home exam, with the maximum grade of E, if two requirements are fulfilled: (1) This is the last remaining exam left before graduation. (2) It is not possible for the student to attend the written exam because the student is, at the point of the request, residing outside of Sweden and will be residing outside of Sweden for at least twelve months following the request. The examiner approves or denies these requests. 

Opportunity to raise an approved grade via renewed examination

There is an opportunity to raise an approved grade via renewed examination at the re-exam or a later exam date. Re-exams are marked as such in the schedule at www.kth.se/schema. Apply by e-mail to fatemeht@kth.se. Include your personal number and course code, as well as the date when you wish to take the re-exam. 

Alternatives to missed activities or tasks

If you are unable to attend a seminar at a particular time and day, you might be able to join another seminar group during the same seminar week. Consult with your course coordinator before changing seminar group. If you fail or are unable to attend one or more of the seminars, you can sign up for a compensation seminar, offered once more towards the end of the course. See course schedule in TimeEdit for scheduling of the compensation seminars. Alternatively, you may re-register and attend remaining seminars during an ensuing course period, conditional on that the seminar is offered in that period. If you complete the seminar module over the course of more than one period, please inform the course coordinator that you have passed all seminars. 

If you miss or fail the exam, you may take the corresponding re-exam. It may also be possible to take the exam during another period. Note however that any bonus points collected during a course period are only valid for the exam and re-exam for that period. If you wish to take the exam after the designated exam or re-exam, check which periods the course is offered in and see corresponding examination dates. Note that you must register on the course and sign up for the exam in order to take the exam.  

If you miss or fail one of the tasks of the project part, you will have to re-take the entire project part. 

Reporting of exam results

Exam results will be communicated to students within 15 workdays following the day of the exam. This might not be met if there is a need to validate a submission or there is suspicion of cheating. 

Ethical approach

  • All members of a group are responsible for the group's work.
  • In any assessment, every student shall honestly disclose any help received and sources used.
  • In an oral assessment, every student shall be able to present and answer questions about the entire assignment and solution.

Plagiarism and other forms of misconduct

All texts are automatically checked for plagiarism, and high plagiarism indication scores are then manually checked. If, after this, there arises suspicion of plagiarism, we are obliged to report this to the disciplinary committee. 

In particular, it is not allowed to: 

  • copy words or ideas from a published source straight into your assignment without acknowledging the source, 
  • copy ideas by making a summary or paraphrasing the original text (that is, by writing it differently) without acknowledging the source of the original idea or words, 
  • copy another student's work and then claim or pretend it is your own, 
  • work so closely with other students on individually-assigned tasks that the final result turns out to be identical or near identical. (However, where to draw the line is not always that clear; ask the teacher if you are uncertain.) 

All sources should be stated using any standard referencing system (see the KTH library). Citations should be marked with citation marks – " " – and the source should be provided. As a simple rule, consider five words or more from a source a citation. To avoid plagiarism charges, a tip is to make notes when reading a text and write your assignment by looking at your notes instead of the text. 

It is not allowed to have someone else write the text or parts thereof for you (ghost writing), nor to have it automatically generated. 

Further information

No information inserted

Round Facts

Start date

28 Aug 2023

Course offering

  • Period 1 Autumn 2023-50049

Language Of Instruction

English

Offered By

ABE/Philosophy

Contacts

Communication during course

Please e-mail the course coordinator with all matters, both administrative and content questions. Contact through e-mail is preferred, please do not use the Canvas messaging system. You may communicate in either Swedish or English. Please state your course code, since the course coordinator handles several courses. 

Course Coordinator

Teachers

Examiner