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AG2144 Sustainable Urban Mobility 7.5 credits

Course memo Autumn 2021-1

Version 2 – 10/14/2021, 10:18:47 AM

Course offering

Autumn 2021-1 (Start date 01/11/2021, English)

Language Of Instruction

English

Offered By

ABE/Urban and Regional Studies

Course memo Autumn 2021-1

Course presentation

The course focuses on how the planning and design of the built environment, transport infrastructure and uses of new technologies can in short and long perspectives enhance sustainable urban mobility transitions. A particular focus is on the relationship between different infrastructures, systems, user needs and practices, as well as governance challenges and the handling of goal conflicts in the transition process.

Content and learning outcomes

Course contents

No information inserted

Intended learning outcomes

After passing the course, the student should be able to:

  • Give an account of practices and infrastructures for sustainable transport and mobility as a component of sustainable urban development
  • Give an account of the interplay between land use planning, transportation planning and other fields of urban development in relation to the furtherance of more sustainable cities and demonstrate an understanding of challenges and opportunities associated with the coordination of transport and mobility planning and other aspects of urban and regional planning
  • Apply theories on sustainability transformation to questions on sustainable transport and mobility in an urban context
  • Demonstrate a qualitative understanding of mobility needs of urban residents and their relation to and experiences from the transport system
  • Discuss how gender, socio-cultural, economic and other factors influence individuals' and different societal groups' accessibility to mobility options
  • Analyse mobility patterns as part of urban social dynamics and transport infrastructure and discuss in a qualitative way the role of social, economic and cultural factors to shape these patterns
  • Analyse alternative courses of action for the development of sustainable urban mobility and discuss the applicability of methods for the accelerating sustainability transformation in relation to sustainable urban transport and mobility
  • Analyse challenges for decision-making and cooperation between different actors in relation to the implementation of measures for sustainable transport and mobility in an urban context

Learning activities

The course consists of lectures, seminars, a group assignment, and an individual assignment. The first part of the course is structured in three packages, where each package contains a number of (2 to 4) lectures and ends with a seminar to discuss the preparatory readings for all lectures of that package. The second part of the course consists of a group assignment followed by an individual assignment, in which course contents from the first part are applied to real-life mobility innovations and policy interventions.

Detailed plan

 

Learning activities Content Preparations (readings numbered as in literature list)

 

--- BLOCK 1: SUSTAINABILITY ---

 

Mon 1 Nov, 13:00-16:00

Lecture

Location: L42

Course introduction +

Sustainable urban mobility: past, present, future

Lecturer: Martin Emanuel

Core readings: [1], [2]

Extensive reading: [3]

Wed 3 Nov, 10:00-12:00

Lecture

Location: V12

Introducing socio-technical systems and transitions

Lecturer: Martin Emanuel

Core readings: [4], [5]

Extensive reading: [6]

Wed 3 Nov, 13:00-16:00

Lecture

Digital (link on Canvas)

Urban mobility transitions

Lecturer: Bipashyee Ghosh

Core readings: [7], [8]

Extensive reading: [9]

Mon 8 Nov 13:00-15:00

Seminar

Location: L22L31L44

Seminar: Sustainability

Seminar leaders: Martin Emanuel, Harriet Dunn, Matt Davoudizavareh

1-2 pages reflection on readings [1]-[9] is uploaded on Canvas by Fri 5 Nov 17:00.

 
--- BLOCK 2: MOBILITY --- 
 

Wed 10 Nov 10:00-12:00

Lecture

Location: Q24

Users in mobility transitions

Lecturer: Liridona Sopjani

Core readings: [10], [11]

Extensive reading: [12]

Mon 15 Nov 13:00-15:00

Lecture

 
Location: Lallerstedt

The New Mobilities Paradigm

Lecturer: Daniel Normark

Core readings: [13]

Extensive reading: [14]

Wed 17 Nov 10:00-12:00

Lecture

Location: Lallerstedt

Moblity cultures, habits and practices

Lecturer: Greger Henriksson

Core readings: [15]

Extensive reading: [16], [17]

Wed 17 Nov 13:00-16:00

Lecture

Location: V12

Mobility justice

Lecturer: Tanja Joelsson

Core readings: [18], [19]

Extensive reading: [20]

Mon 22 Nov 13:00-15:00

Seminar

Location: E33E34E36

Seminar: Mobility

Seminar leaders: Martin Emanuel, Harriet Dunn, Matt Davoudizavareh

1-2 pages reflection on readings [10]-[20] is uploaded on Canvas by Fri 19 Nov 17:00.
 
--- BLOCK 3: GOVERNANCE --- 
 

Wed 24 Nov 10:00-12:00

Lecture

Location: B23

Governing mobility transitions

Lecturer: Karolina Isaksson

Core readings: [21], [22], [23]

Extensive reading: [24], [25]

Wed 24 Nov 13:00-15:00

Lecture

Location: B23

Governing urban and regional systems

Lecturer: Patrik Tornberg

Core readings: [26], [27], [28]

Extensive reading: [29], [30]

Mon 29 Nov 13:00-15:00

Seminar

Location: D33D34D35

Seminar: Governance

Seminar leaders: Martin Emanuel, Harriet Dunn, Matt Davoudizavareh

1-2 pages reflection on readings [21]-[30] is uploaded on Canvas by Fri 26 Nov 17:00.
 
--- GROUP & INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS --- 
 

Wed 1 Dec 9:00-16:00

Workshop

Location: TBA

Group assignment: Start-up workshop

Readings: [31]-[33]

Mon 6 Dec 13:00-16:00

Tutorial

Location: TBA

Group assignment: Tutorial Time slots available to book a few days in advance.

Mon 13 Dec 13:00-16:00

Seminar

Location: B22L22M38

Group assignment: Peer feedback

Individual assignment: Start-up mini-seminar

Draft 8-10 pages group assignment is uploaded on Canvas by Fri 10 Dec 17:00.

Fri 17 Dec 12:00

Deadline for uploading final version of written group assignment on Canvas.

Wed 14 Jan 12:00

Deadline for uploading final version of written individual assignment on Canvas.


Schema HT-2021-274

Preparations before course start

Literature

Students are advised to pre-read the literature relating to each lecture theme in order to better benefit from the lectures. The literature listed under each “block” is reading for the related seminar. Literature marked within an asterix (*) is core reading and expected reading for the seminars. No asterix means suggested, extensive reading for those who are looking for a more in-depth understanding of the topic. Literature under "Group assignment" is mandatory reading before the Start-up Workshop.

Block 1 (lectures 1-3, seminar 1)

Sustainable urban mobility: past, present, future

[1] * Schipper, F., Emanuel, M., & Oldenziel, R. (2020). Sustainable Urban Mobility in the Present, Past, and Future. Technology and Culture, 61(1), 307-317. DOI: 10.1353/tech.2020.0004

[2] * Holden, E., Linnerud, K., & Banister, D. (2013). Sustainable passenger transport: Back to Brundtland. Transportation Research. Part A, Policy and Practice, 54, 67-77. DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2013.07.012

[3] Banister, D. (2008). The sustainable mobility paradigm. Transport Policy, 15(2), 73-80. DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2007.10.005

Introducing socio-technical systems and transitions

[4] * Geels, F. (2012). A socio-technical analysis of low-carbon transitions: Introducing the multi-level perspective into transport studies. Journal of Transport Geography, 24, 471-482. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2012.01.021

[5] * Geels, F. (2005). The dynamics of transitions in socio-technical systems: A multi-level analysis of the transition pathway from horse-drawn carriages to automobiles (1860-1930). Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 17(4), 445-476. DOI: 10.1080/09537320500357319

[6] Urry, J. (2004). The ‘System’ of Automobility. Theory, Culture & Society, 21(4-5), 25-39. DOI: 10.1177/0263276404046059

Urban mobility transitions

[7] * Marletto, G. (2014). Car and the city: Socio-technical transition pathways to 2030. Technological Forecasting & Social Change, 87, 164-178. DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2013.12.013

[8] * Ghosh, B., & Schot, J. (2019). Towards a novel regime change framework: Studying mobility transitions in public transport regimes in an Indian megacity. Energy Research & Social Science, 51, 82-95. DOI: 10.1016/j.erss.2018.12.001

[9] Nykvist, B., & Whitmarsh, L. (2008). A multi-level analysis of sustainable mobility transitions: Niche development in the UK and Sweden. Technological Forecasting & Social Change, 75(9), 1373-1387. DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2008.05.006

Block 2 (lectures 4-7, seminar 2)

Users in mobility transitions

[10] * Sopjani, L., Stier, J. J., Ritzén, S., Hesselgren, M., & Georén, P. (2019). Involving users and user roles in the transition to sustainable mobility systems: The case of light electric vehicle sharing in Sweden. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 71, 207-221. DOI: 10.1016/j.trd.2018.12.011

[11] * Shove, E., & Walker, G. (2007). CAUTION! Transitions ahead: politics, practice, and sustainable transition management. Environment and Planning A, 39(4), 763-770. DOI: 10.1068/a39310

[12] Kanger, L., & Schot, J. (2016). User-made immobilities: a transitions perspective. Mobilities, 11(4), 598-613. DOI: 10.1080/17450101.2016.1211827

New mobilities paradigm

[13] * Sheller, M., & Urry, J. (2016). Mobilizing the new mobilities paradigm. Applied Mobilities, 1(1), 10-25. DOI:10.1080/23800127.2016.1151216

[14] Cresswell, T. (2010). Towards a Politics of Mobility. Environment and Planning. D, Society & Space, 28(1), 17-31. DOI: 10.1068/d11407

Mobility cultures, habits and practices

[15] * Aldred, R., & Jungnickel, K. (2014). Why culture matters for transport policy: The case of cycling in the UK. Journal of Transport Geography, 34, 78-87. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2013.11.004

[16] Schwanen, T., Banister, D., & Anable, J. (2012). Rethinking habits and their role in behaviour change: The case of low-carbon mobility. Journal of Transport Geography, 24, 522-532. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2012.06.003

[17] Klinger, T., Kenworthy, J., & Lanzendorf, M. (2013). Dimensions of urban mobility cultures – a comparison of German cities. Journal of Transport Geography, 31, 18-29. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2013.05.002

Mobility justice

[18] * Pereira, R. H., Schwanen, T., & Banister, D. (2017). Distributive justice and equity in transportation. Transport reviews, 37(2), 170-191. DOI: 10.1080/01441647.2016.1257660

[19] * Sheller, M. (2015). Racialized Mobility Transitions in Philadelphia: Connecting Urban Sustainability and Transport Justice. City & Society, 27(1), 70-91. DOI: 10.1111/ciso.12049

[20] Martens, K. (2012). Justice in transport as justice in accessibility: applying Walzer’s ‘Spheres of Justice’ to the transport sector. Transportation (Dordrecht), 39(6), 1035-1053. DOI:10.1007/s11116-012-9388-7

Block 3 (lectures 8-9, seminar 3)

Governing mobility transitions

[21] * Oldbury, K., & Isaksson, K. (2021). Governance arrangements shaping driverless shuttles in public transport: The case of Barkarbystaden, Stockholm. Cities, 113, 103-146. DOI: 10.1016/j.cities.2021.103146

[22] * Haarstad, H. (2016). Where are urban energy transitions governed? Conceptualizing the complex governance arrangements for low-carbon mobility in Europe. Cities, 54, 4-10. DOI: 10.1016/j.cities.2015.10.013

[23] * Walker, B. J., Adger, W. N., & Russel, D. (2015). Institutional barriers to climate change adaptation in decentralised governance structures: Transport planning in England. Urban studies, 52(12), 2250-2266. DOI: 10.1177/0042098014544759

[24] Docherty, I., Marsden, G., & Anable, J. (2018). The governance of smart mobility. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 115, 114-125. DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2017.09.012

[25] Marsden, G., Ferreira, A., Bache, I., Flinders, M., & Bartle, I. (2014). Muddling through with climate change targets: a multi-level governance perspective on the transport sector. Climate policy, 14(5), 617-636. DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2014.905823

Governing urban and regional systems

[26] * Stead, D. (2016). Key research themes on governance and sustainable urban mobility. International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, 10(1), 40-48. DOI: 10.1080/15568318.2013.821008

[27] * Bertolini, L. (2017). Planning the mobile metropolis: Transport for people, places and the planet (Planning, environment, cities. London, England: Palgrave. (Chapter 2)

[28] * Legacy, C., Curtis, C., & Sturup, S. (2012). Is there a good governance model for the delivery of contemporary transport policy and practice? An examination of Melbourne and Perth. Transport Policy, 19(1), 8-16. DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2011.0

[29] Tornberg, P., & Odhage, J. (n.d.). Back and forth between openness and focusing: Handling complexity in land use and transport coordination. European Planning Studies, (Ahead-of-print), 1-18. DOI: 10.1080/09654313.2021.1926437

[30] Hull, A. (2008). Policy integration: What will it take to achieve more sustainable transport solutions in cities? Transport policy, 15(2), 94-103. DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2007.10.004

Group assignment

[31] Wee, B. v., Annema, J. A., & Banister, D. (2013). The transport system and transport policy: An introduction. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar. (Chapters 12 and 14 on policy evaluation principles and methods.)

[32] Hughes, N. (2013). Towards improving the relevance of scenarios for public policy questions: A proposed methodological framework for policy relevant low carbon scenarios. Technological forecasting & social change, 80(4), 687-698. doi:10.1016/j.techfore.2012.07.009

[33] Elzen, B., Geels, F. W., Green, K., & Hofman, P. S. (2004). Socio-technical Scenarios as a Tool for Transition Policy: An Example from the Traffic and Transport Domain. In System Innovation and the Transition to Sustainability: Theory, Evidence and Policy. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.

Examination and completion

Grading scale

A, B, C, D, E, FX, F

Examination

  • INL1 - Hand in assignment, 3.0 credits, Grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F
  • PRO1 - Project, 2.5 credits, Grading scale: A, B, C, D, E, FX, F
  • SEM1 - Seminar, 2.0 credits, Grading scale: P, F

Based on recommendation from KTH’s coordinator for disabilities, the examiner will decide how to adapt an examination for students with documented disability.

The examiner may apply another examination format when re-examining individual students.

The examiner determines, based on recommendation from the KTH office of support to students with disabilities, possible adapted examination for students with documented, permanent disabilities.

The examiner may permit other examination formats at the re-examination of individual students.

(Section below is not part of the syllabus)

The deadlines for submission of the assignments of the course is found in the Detailed plan (above).

Seminars (SEM1)

The course includes nine lectures that correspond to three literature packages of two-four lectures each. The literature relating to the three packages are discussed in the form of seminars for which students are to hand in 1-2 pages of reflections on the specific literature in advance. These reflections should be guided by questions posted separately on Canvas well in advance of each seminar. Seminar reflections are graded pass or fail (P/F). When a reflection does not live up to the requirements to pass, the student will have a chance to improve based on teachers’ feedback. Seminar attendance and active participation in discussions is mandatory. Students who miss a seminar (incl. late submission of a reflection) will have to make up for it at an extra seminar towards the end of the course.

Project (PRO1)

The project is made up of a group assignment in which students assess and analyze a real-life urban mobility issue. Every group of 3–4 students will work with a specific mobility innovation or policy intervention in a given spatial context (e.g. city, city-region, city district). The aim is that students gain an understanding of the complexity of urban mobility transitions to achieve sustainable development, and that they acquire a capacity to elaborate different scenarios that may occur based on different choices and solutions. The groups work is facilitated by a number of activities (start-up workshop, tutorial, peer-feedback) and should result in a 8-10 pages written report, which is graded A-F. When an report receives the grade Fx, the student group will have a chance to improve based on teachers’ feedback. A detailed instruction will be posted separately on Canvas well in advance of the start of the group work.

Hand in assignment (INL1)

For the individual assignment, students are to write an essay in which they carry out an extended discussion in relation to the issue that they worked with in the group assignment, including further analysis and reflection based on theories and concepts presented in the course literature. The aim is that students gain an understanding of the governance challenges related to urban mobility transitions, and that they acquire a capacity to carry out theoretical analysis of sustainability transformations in the domain of urban mobility. The individual assignment is started off with a mini-seminar and should result in a 6-8 pages written essay, which is graded A-F. When an essay receives the grade Fx, the student will have a chance to improve based on teachers’ feedback. A more detailed instruction will be posted separately on Canvas well in advance of the start of the individual assignment.

Grading criteria/assessment criteria

Intended learning outcomes (repeated)

 After passing the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Give an account of practices and infrastructures for sustainable transport and mobility as a component of sustainable urban development
  2. Give an account of the interplay between land use planning, transportation planning and other fields of urban development in relation to the furtherance of more sustainable cities and demonstrate an understanding of challenges and opportunities associated with the coordination of transport and mobility planning and other aspects of urban and regional planning
  3. Apply theories on sustainability transformation to questions on sustainable transport and mobility in an urban context
  4. Demonstrate a qualitative understanding of mobility needs of urban residents and their relation to and experiences from the transport system
  5. Discuss how gender, socio-cultural, economic and other factors influence individuals' and different societal groups' accessibility to mobility options
  6. Analyse mobility patterns as part of urban social dynamics and transport infrastructure and discuss in a qualitative way the role of social, economic and cultural factors to shape these patterns
  7. Analyse alternative courses of action for the development of sustainable urban mobility and discuss the applicability of methods for the accelerating sustainability transformation in relation to sustainable urban transport and mobility
  8. Analyse challenges for decision-making and cooperation between different actors in relation to the implementation of measures for sustainable transport and mobility in an urban context

Seminars (SEM1)

The seminars examines (P/F) learning outcomes [a], [b] and[e] and is formative for the other learning outcomes. 

In order to Pass, the student shall be able to:

  • Account for how mobility features as a problem and possibility for achieving sustainable urban development
  • Account for strategies to mitigate the impact of mobility on sustainable urban development
  • Account for how access to mobility is distributed across social groups
  • Interpret findings related to accessibility from different conceptualizations of mobility justice and equity.
  • Give examples of inter- and intragenerational conflicts (at least one of each) with respect to sustainable urban mobility
  • Account for core aspects of integrated land use and transport planning
  • Give examples of challenges of integrated planning and its relevance to sustainable urban development

Project (PRO1)

The group assignment examines (A-F) learning outcomes [d], [f] and [g].

E D C B A
Discusses how users' needs are met and experiences impacted by (changes in) the transport system. All requirements for E and at least half of additional requirements for C. In addition: clear analysis; differentiates between needs of and impacts on various user groups. All requirements for C and at least half of additional requirements for A. In addition:  thorough analysis grounded in relevant theory; strong conceptualization.
Identifies and discusses relevant contextual factors that influences a mobility innovation/policy intervention and its effects. In addition: clear analysis; including relative importance of various contextual factors. In addition: thorough analysis grounded in relevant theory; strong coneptualization.
Clearly outlines, based on given material, two scenarios of how a given mobility innovation/policy intervention might unfold over time, including a proto-assessment of their sustainability impact(s). In addition: based also on own relevant sources; discusses the relative likelyhood of different scenarios; strong assessment of their sustainability impact(s). In addition: discusses the role and stakes of various stakholders in different scenarios; critically reflects on sustainability impact(s).

Hand in assignment (INL1)

The individual assignment examines (A-F) learning outcomes [c], [g] and [h].

E D C B A
Applies a relevant theory, with only minor misunderstandings, to analyze a given mobility innovation/policy intervention in an urban context. All requirements for E and at least half of additional requirements for C. Applies theory creatively (independently) and convincingly (fruitfully given the particular case). All requirements for C and at least half of additional requirements for A. Applies theory reflectively (adressing strengths/weaknesses; contrasting different theoretical approaches).
Discusses the potential sustainability impact(s) of a given mobility innovation/policy intervention. Discusses the sustainability impact(s) of a given mobility innovation/policy intervention in various scenarios. In addition: critically addresses the trade-offs and tensions between different sustainability impacts.
Identifies, including a proto-analysis of, governance challenges related to a given moblity innovation/policy intervention. In addition: clear analysis; addresses the roles and stakes of multiple stakeholders. In addition: thorough analysis; critical reflection.

Final grade

The final grade of the full course (A-F) is weighted between a student’s grade in PRO1 and INL1, with some more weight given to INL1 as it corresponds to more credits, higher order learning goals, and reflects the individual student’s performance better than PRO1.

If not passed, the student will be failed with Fx if small adjustments needed, otherwise F.

Ethical approach

  • All members of a group are responsible for the group's work.
  • In any assessment, every student shall honestly disclose any help received and sources used.
  • In an oral assessment, every student shall be able to present and answer questions about the entire assignment and solution.

Further information

No information inserted

Round Facts

Offered By

ABE/Urban and Regional Studies

Language Of Instruction

English

Course offering

Autumn 2021-1 (Start date 01/11/2021, English)