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November 2016
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 7 November 2016
Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

Q187f255a1-95f0-4932-b38e-16b6e609a8b0

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 20 September 2016
Scheduling staff edited 1 November 2016

Tisdag 8 november 2016 kl 132:00 - 15:00

Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

V30e2af584-d1d1-40c8-83b1-e3fdb285dcc5

 
September 2016
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 7 March 2016
Scheduling staff removed the event 2 September 2016

Scheduling staff restored the event from the trash can. 2 September 2016

Scheduling staff edited 30 September 2016

Torsdag 6 oktober 2016 kl 154:00 - 17:00

Q3L51

Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 3 October 2016

Guest: Staffan Björk¶

Title talk 1: Computer-Augmented Board Games¶

Talk 1: The development of early computer games have surprisingly many connections to board games, but computer games began to diverge from board games as CPUs became more powerful and user interfaces became richer in detail. However, the ubiquity of smart phones and tablet computers have opened up possibilities for a reunification of the two through board games that make use of computational technologies. This talk will present the concept of computer-augmented board games together with commercial examples and several research experiments using technologies others than smart phones and tablets to juxtapose board games and computer games.¶

-------------------¶

Title talk 2: The Dark Side of Game Design?¶

Talk 2: A Discussion about Dark Gameplay Design Patterns¶

Talk: Game design is typically presented as being benevolent and focusing on giving players positive experiences. However, this may not necessarily be true, for example due to commercial constraints. While it is often easy to find examples of questionable designs when looking at theme or narration in games, this presentation looks at how the gameplay itself can be argued to be dark or when players or others may perceive a game design as having "dark" problems regarding gameplay.¶

About: Staffan Björk is a professor in interaction design at Gothenburg University and has focused on game research since 1999. He has been involved in projects focusing on pervasive games as well as introduced gameplay design patterns together with Jussi Holopainen as a way of having a vocabulary for gameplay design and analysis.¶

Literature: Se the Literature webpage.¶

Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 3 October 2016

Guest: Staffan Björk, Professor in interaction design at Gothenburg University

Title talk 1: Computer-Augmented Board Games

Talk 1: The development of early computer games have surprisingly many connections to board games, but computer games began to diverge from board games as CPUs became more powerful and user interfaces became richer in detail. However, the ubiquity of smart phones and tablet computers have opened up possibilities for a reunification of the two through board games that make use of computational technologies. This talk will present the concept of computer-augmented board games together with commercial examples and several research experiments using technologies others than smart phones and tablets to juxtapose board games and computer games.

-------------------

Title talk 2: The Dark Side of Game Design?

Talk 2: A Discussion about Dark Gameplay Design Patterns

Talk: Game design is typically presented as being benevolent and focusing on giving players positive experiences. However, this may not necessarily be true, for example due to commercial constraints. While it is often easy to find examples of questionable designs when looking at theme or narration in games, this presentation looks at how the gameplay itself can be argued to be dark or when players or others may perceive a game design as having "dark" problems regarding gameplay.

About: Staffan Björk is a professor in interaction design at Gothenburg University and has focused on game research since 1999. He has been involved in projects focusing on pervasive games as well as introduced gameplay design patterns together with Jussi Holopainen as a way of having a vocabulary for gameplay design and analysis.

Literature: Se the Literature webpage.

Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 4 October 2016

Guest: Staffan Björk, Professor in interaction design at Gothenburg University

Title talk 1: Computer-Augmented Board Games

Talk 1: The development of early computer games have surprisingly many connections to board games, but computer games began to diverge from board games as CPUs became more powerful and user interfaces became richer in detail. However, the ubiquity of smart phones and tablet computers have opened up possibilities for a reunification of the two through board games that make use of computational technologies. This talk will present the concept of computer-augmented board games together with commercial examples and several research experiments using technologies others than smart phones and tablets to juxtapose board games and computer games.

-------------------

Title talk 2: The Dark Side of Game Design?

Talk 2: A Discussion about Dark Gameplay Design Patterns

Talk: Game design is typically presented as being benevolent and focusing on giving players positive experiences. However, this may not necessarily be true, for example due to commercial constraints. While it is often easy to find examples of questionable designs when looking at theme or narration in games, this presentation looks at how the gameplay itself can be argued to be dark or when players or others may perceive a game design as having "dark" problems regarding gameplay.

About: Staffan Björk is a professor in interaction design at Gothenburg University and has focused on game research since 1999. He has been involved in projects focusing on pervasive games as well as introduced gameplay design patterns together with Jussi Holopainen as a way of having a vocabulary for gameplay design and analysis.

Literature: Se the Literature webpage.

Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

L51e4358b16-9bad-4613-aba6-a071ebc8db5e

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 20 September 2016
Scheduling staff edited 20 September 2016

Tisdag 8 november 2016 kl 09:00 - 123:00

Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

V346b51d868-b885-4eab-9e88-4a507b5616bf

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 20 September 2016
Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

Q187f255a1-95f0-4932-b38e-16b6e609a8b0

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 20 September 2016
Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

Q187f255a1-95f0-4932-b38e-16b6e609a8b0

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 16 September 2016
Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 16 September 2016

Guest: Krzysztof Krzyscin, Technical Art Director at CD PROJEKT RED¶

Guest: Konrad Tomaszkiewicz, Game Director at CD PROJEKT RED¶

Title: Video Games Tech Evolution¶

Talk: Driven by constant improvements in their underlying technology, video games are the fastest evolving kind of software. This talk will present a global overview of the changes we adopted to across 13 years of franchise development of the computer game "The Witcher", with a special focus on engine changes, rendering and the content creation pipeline.¶

About: Krzysztof Krzyscin is a passionate gamer, raised on games like original Fallout (1 and 2), Quake and of course Dune (on Amiga!). He has develop games since 2004, starting as Environmental Artist in small indie company - making outsource assets for The Witcher (2006). Later, he worked on a few unannounced Star Wars universe games in Free Radical Design (UK). He joined CD Projekt RED in 2009, as Senior Environmental Artist, later assembling & leading Technical Art team (shipping The Witcher 2 on the PC and XBOX 360 platforms). Right now he is in charge of the Technical Art department, covering all projects (The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt on PC, XBOX ONE, PS4, upcoming Cyberpunk 2077), and acting as Head of R&D, researching content pipeline improvements, exploring new shading and rendering techniques and guiding performance and optimization related tasks.¶

Konrad Tomaszkiewicz started his professional game development career in 2005. His deep knowledge of games landed him a position in CD Projekt RED as a tester. Not much time passed before Tomaszkiewicz was recognized as an avid designer, who, thanks to his hard work, later became the lead of quest designers. Currently, Konrad holds the position of Game Director at CD Project RED.¶

Website: https://www.cdprojekt.com/en/¶



Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

D2fc778271-7ea4-4a0e-9ee3-0e5a429c75e3

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 7 March 2016
Scheduling staff removed the event 2 September 2016

Scheduling staff restored the event from the trash can. 2 September 2016

commented 13 September 2016

Should any specific work be made in preparation of this seminar? There are no instructions or deadlines posted for it. 

Administrator commented 15 September 2016

15 minutes of preparation will be enough. More info later today here as well as on the lecture. /Daniel

Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 15 September 2016

NOTE: We all meet in M37 which is the bigger of the two seminar room. It  will be crowded and many will have to stand but it will only take 10-15 minutes before you are divided into smaller groups. Please be on time! Late arrivals will have fewer options! Here's how you prepare for the seminar:¶

A) Read through the 20 short future-related topics below. We have harvested these topics from your essays, from our guest lectures and from literature.¶

B) "VOTE" HERE for your three favorite topics/technologies. These are the topics you could imagine yourself exploring during the project phase, or, that you at least would like another group to work with during the project phase. Your vote is a vote on interesting topics - not a pledge as to what you want/will work on during the project phase. ¶

NOTE: perhaps we were better at formulating certain topics than others - your task is to see through and beyond the short descriptions and imagine what these topics could be developed into!¶

C). You are hopefully inspired by several of the topics, but you might realize that we have missed an excellent topic that really should have been on this list. Invent a title and write a short text about that topic (1-3 sentences) as a comment to this blog post. This will help us generate topics for the next seminar!¶

-----------------------¶

1) The future of indie games. Independent game developers are the innovators. What is the future of independent games when it has never been easier to develop games but never been harder to break through the clutter (can focus on tech, economy, culture etc.)¶

2) The future of AAA games. Big games, big studios, big publishers and multi-million dollar big marketing budgets - what are the trends and what is the future of big-budget games?¶

3) The future of casual games. What came before Candy Crush Saga (Farmville?). But what is happening right now and are the trends that will shape the future of casual games?¶

4) The future of [some specific gaming genre]. What does the future of racing, sports, real-time strategy, turn-based strategy, massively multiplayer online or some other specific gaming genre look like?¶

5) The future of games as an interactive expressive genre. One guest said that games can evoke any feeling (empathy, anger, hate, melancholy, sorrow, fear, horror, love, regret...). What is the future of games as emotional conduits? (It's possible to look at feelings in general or some specific feeling.)¶

6) The future of game art. Games will of course continue to become increasingly photo-realistic, but how can game become a more artistic medium? What has been done and how could surreal or challenging genres of non-figureative art be used in games? (Let's just say that van Gogh didn't try to paint "realistically".)¶

7) The future of storytelling/game writing. How complicated stories can be told through games. Games, as apart from literature and movies are not linear. That implies restrictions but also possibilities. What has been done in terms of leveraging game characteristics (for example interactivity) in ways impossible in other media. What kind of amazing "stories" will future computer games be able to narrate?¶

8) The future of game sounds. Games emphasise visuals and sound is probably undervalued. What is the connection between sound and immersion? What are the challenges of generating sound and music in games? What is the state of art and the future of 3D-sound? How do you generate sound that "fits" the action on the screen (as interactively generated by the player(s))? ¶

9) The future of game medialisation. Many people spend time not *playing* games but watching others play games (e-sports, pewdiepie). Will games come to rival TV? How can we understand (and what are the characteristics of) watching others play games in terms of constituting a new "media format"?¶

10) Virtual reality gaming tech of the future. What will present and future technological developments bring in terms of virtual reality gaming? Is VR here to stay and how will it be used/harnessed by the games industry?¶

11) Virtual reality gaming business models of the future. Virtual Reality might be great, but what are the emerging business models that could help it leave the drawing board and "make it happen"?¶

12) The future of mixed reality boardgames. Thuresson talked about "Tabletop warriors" adding a battle to the desk in front of you with warriors hiding behind the teacup and skirting around the speaker. It's also possible to imagine more tame scenarios where traditional boardgames (e.g. Monopoly) are "enhanced" digitally through AR och just by utilising tablets. So what is the future of "digitally enhanced" board games?¶

13) Pervasive gaming. Using the neighbourhood block, the city or a whole country as a game board. What has already been done and what does the future look like?¶

14) Better than real life? On the addictive qualities of computer games and perhaps with a focus on huge gaming worlds (massively multiplayer games, e.g. World of Warcraft) where some people spend a larger proportion of their waking life than in reality. Is it sensible to talk about this phenomenon in terms of "immigration"?¶

15) Computer games business models. Where and how is the money made in and around computer games? This could include or focus on strange phenomena such as "Real money trade (RMT) of virtual objects", e.g. paying 1000 SEK or more for buying a virtual sword in an online game or paying a sweatshop in China for "levelling up" your low-level World of Warcraft Druid while you are off to KTH studying a course about computer games. ¶

16) Games and learning. What is the future of learning with/through games at school and outside of school? How are games used and how could/will they be used in the future for learning English, History etc. (speculative angle: "Ender's game".)¶

17) The future of gamer demographics. The stereotype of hard-core gamers has become more nuanced as "everybody" plays games nowadays; children, mothers, professionals, the elderly and so on. Who will play games in the future (could be specialised, for example focusing on "retired people" or other specific groups)¶

18) Gaming families. Games as a pastime in the family (intergenerational gaming). Or can we imagine that stable online friends have or will take the role that other family members do in the nuclear family (i.e. you gamer friends over time *become* your family.  ¶

19) On game characters as "friends". Some IP has been around "forever" and can feel like "old friends" (for example Mario, Zelda). What do games do to us in terms of our emotional attachments to other people and to gaming characters today and in the future?¶

20) The future of anti-social game behavior. Some people play (multiplayer) games with the explicit goal of making others mad, sad or angry (trash talk, "griefing", bullying). How do you "regulate" social interaction inside computer games? What is it possible to do? And, is it even desirable? What is the future of (negative) gaming experiences?¶



commented 15 September 2016

Gaming for personal improvement (the future of gamification in everyday life).

commented 15 September 2016

Gaming while sleeping. People usually dream while sleeping. Start games before sleeping, and the process of gaming is just like having a dream.

commented 16 September 2016

Physical movement in games is a big trend over the last years. However I think we all have experienced insufficient tracking. How does the future look in new sensors etc. and is there a future for games in this specific area? What possibilities for making it more accurate is there? (My main thoughts is more collaborative games so maybe not VR but maybe we will have a collaborative VR in the near future?)

commented 16 September 2016

Women in the gaming industry. How does an increasing number of women in the area affect both developing games and also the target group of gamers. Will there be a shift in type of games due to the growing number of women on both sides?

commented 16 September 2016

Revolutionary play - Annika Waern discussed the reality in pervasive games where the assignment could be to pick up trash from a river. How does the future look like within this field, what kind of revolutionary power could games have when focusing on the environment, what kind of changes could it bring in us or in society?

commented 16 September 2016

Future of kids/teens in gaming? Is there a trend of moving away from the passive user type towards an active player type, who doesn't just consume the gaming experience, but actively seeks to produce games as well? How can the new generation change the perception of gaming in the future? 

Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 16 September 2016

NOTE: We all meet in M37 which is the bigger of the two seminar room. It  will be crowded and many will have to stand but it will only take 10-15 minutes before you are divided into smaller groups. Please be on time! Late arrivals will have fewer options! Here's how you prepare for the seminar:

A) Read through the 20 short future-related topics below. We have harvested these topics from your essays, from our guest lectures and from literature.

B) "VOTE" HERE for your three favorite topics/technologies. These are the topics you could imagine yourself exploring during the project phase, or, that you at least would like another group to work with during the project phase. Your vote is a vote on interesting topics - not a pledge as to what you want/will work on during the project phase. 

NOTE: perhaps we were better at formulating certain topics than others - your task is to see through and beyond the short descriptions and imagine what these topics could be developed into!

C). You are hopefully inspired by several of the topics, but you might realize that we have missed an excellent topic that really should have been on this list. Invent a title and write a short text about that topic (1-3 sentences) as a comment to this blog post. This will help us generate topics for the next seminar!

-----------------------

1) The future of indie games. Independent game developers are the innovators. What is the future of independent games when it has never been easier to develop games but never been harder to break through the clutter (can focus on tech, economy, culture etc.)¶ 2) The future of AAA games. Big games, big studios, big publishers and multi-million dollar big marketing budgets - what are the trends and what is the future of big-budget games?¶ 3) The future of casual games. What came before Candy Crush Saga (Farmville?). But what is happening right now and are the trends that will shape the future of casual games?¶ 4) The future of [some specific gaming genre]. What does the future of racing, sports, real-time strategy, turn-based strategy, massively multiplayer online or some other specific gaming genre look like?¶ 5) The future of games as an interactive expressive genre. One guest said that games can evoke any feeling (empathy, anger, hate, melancholy, sorrow, fear, horror, love, regret...). What is the future of games as emotional conduits? (It's possible to look at feelings in general or some specific feeling.)¶ 6) The future of game art. Games will of course continue to become increasingly photo-realistic, but how can game become a more artistic medium? What has been done and how could surreal or challenging genres of non-figureative art be used in games? (Let's just say that van Gogh didn't try to paint "realistically".)¶ 7) The future of storytelling/game writing. How complicated stories can be told through games. Games, as apart from literature and movies are not linear. That implies restrictions but also possibilities. What has been done in terms of leveraging game characteristics (for example interactivity) in ways impossible in other media. What kind of amazing "stories" will future computer games be able to narrate?¶ 8) The future of game sounds. Games emphasise visuals and sound is probably undervalued. What is the connection between sound and immersion? What are the challenges of generating sound and music in games? What is the state of art and the future of 3D-sound? How do you generate sound that "fits" the action on the screen (as interactively generated by the player(s))? ¶ 9) The future of game medialisation. Many people spend time not *playing* games but watching others play games (e-sports, pewdiepie). Will games come to rival TV? How can we understand (and what are the characteristics of) watching others play games in terms of constituting a new "media format"?¶ 10) Virtual reality gaming tech of the future. What will present and future technological developments bring in terms of virtual reality gaming? Is VR here to stay and how will it be used/harnessed by the games industry?¶ 11) Virtual reality gaming business models of the future. Virtual Reality might be great, but what are the emerging business models that could help it leave the drawing board and "make it happen"?¶ 12) The future of mixed reality boardgames. Thuresson talked about "Tabletop warriors" adding a battle to the desk in front of you with warriors hiding behind the teacup and skirting around the speaker. It's also possible to imagine more tame scenarios where traditional boardgames (e.g. Monopoly) are "enhanced" digitally through AR och just by utilising tablets. So what is the future of "digitally enhanced" board games?¶ 13) Pervasive gaming. Using the neighbourhood block, the city or a whole country as a game board. What has already been done and what does the future look like?¶ 14) Better than real life? On the addictive qualities of computer games and perhaps with a focus on huge gaming worlds (massively multiplayer games, e.g. World of Warcraft) where some people spend a larger proportion of their waking life than in reality. Is it sensible to talk about this phenomenon in terms of "immigration"?¶ 15) Computer games business models. Where and how is the money made in and around computer games? This could include or focus on strange phenomena such as "Real money trade (RMT) of virtual objects", e.g. paying 1000 SEK or more for buying a virtual sword in an online game or paying a sweatshop in China for "levelling up" your low-level World of Warcraft Druid while you are off to KTH studying a course about computer games. ¶ 16) Games and learning. What is the future of learning with/through games at school and outside of school? How are games used and how could/will they be used in the future for learning English, History etc. (speculative angle: "Ender's game".)¶ 17) The future of gamer demographics. The stereotype of hard-core gamers has become more nuanced as "everybody" plays games nowadays; children, mothers, professionals, the elderly and so on. Who will play games in the future (could be specialised, for example focusing on "retired people" or other specific groups)¶ 18) Gaming families. Games as a pastime in the family (intergenerational gaming). Or can we imagine that stable online friends have or will take the role that other family members do in the nuclear family (i.e. you gamer friends over time *become* your family.  ¶ 19) On game characters as "friends". Some IP has been around "forever" and can feel like "old friends" (for example Mario, Zelda). What do games do to us in terms of our emotional attachments to other people and to gaming characters today and in the future?¶ 20) The future of anti-social game behavior. Some people play (multiplayer) games with the explicit goal of making others mad, sad or angry (trash talk, "griefing", bullying). How do you "regulate" social interaction inside computer games? What is it possible to do? And, is it even desirable? What is the future of (negative) gaming experiences?Further see the Instructions for Seminar 2

Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

M37, M38368e0b07-4c35-4599-98ba-0f09b6f75aec, 6f0eb6fd-2cb3-41b2-ba4c-d3cbd683f3d2

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 7 March 2016
Scheduling staff removed the event 2 September 2016

Scheduling staff restored the event from the trash can. 2 September 2016

Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 13 September 2016

Guest: Björn Thuresson: teacher, researcher and manager of the KTH Visualisation Studio.¶

Title: VR, AR and beyond ¶

Talk: What’s behind the current hype for Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR)? Which more specifically are the technologies? What are their affordances and shortcomings, and, what happens next?¶

Bio: Björn Thuresson has a background in cinema and media, both from a practice and a research perspective. He’s been going back and forth between academia and industry and has during the last few years built up visualisation as an academic subject at KTH and set up a large network of company collaborations. He is also running the KTH Visualisation Studio as a lab environment for realising and building future technologies.¶

Literature: Please have a look at:¶


* http://venturebeat.com/2016/07/14/why-virtual-augmented-and-mixed-reality-are-the-4th-wave-of-tech/
* http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/06/htc-vive-mixed-reality-vr-how-to-explained/
* https://forums.oculus.com/community/discussion/42250/facts-vs-fiction-cybersickness

Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

L52dc0d3c69-a803-4060-b7a2-acce56f4a29c

 
under
HT 2016 futurem16
Scheduling staff created event 7 March 2016
Scheduling staff removed the event 2 September 2016

Scheduling staff restored the event from the trash can. 2 September 2016

Administrator Daniel Pargman edited 12 September 2016

Guest: Daniel Pargman, Associate professor in Media Technology, Department of Media Technology and Interaction Design, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH Royal Institute of Technology¶

Title: Theory and method of Design Fiction – what this course is really about ¶

Talk: We are doing "Design Fiction" in this course. Design fiction is the use of narrative elements and scenarios to envision, explain and raise questions about possible futures. I will discuss the term and the practice of envisioning the future through narrative scenarios (i.e. envisioning the future through convincing and compelling stories).¶

Literature:¶

1) Daniel Pargman (2014). "The Future of News and ICT for Sustainability 2029". This paper was submitted to the workshop "Alternate Endings: Using Fiction to Explore Design Futures" that was held at the CHI 2014 conference.2) A great example of near-future design fiction explorations are the British television series "Black Mirror". If you have the time, please watch the episode "The Entire History of You" (48 minutes). All seven Black Mirror episodes are available on YouTube and Netflix. Do watch other episodes if you have the time. My personal favourite is "Fifteen Million Merits"3) Optional: read Daniel's longwinded-but-hopefully informative and entertaining blog post about a one-day Design Fiction workshop at the CHI 2014 conference (see above). ¶

Scheduling staff edited 15 January 2018

L52dc0d3c69-a803-4060-b7a2-acce56f4a29c

 
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