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Docent Lecture: How does our understanding of history influence which landscapes we choose to protect?

Please be warmly invited to Kati Lindström’s Docent lecture. Kati Lindström, researcher at the Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, has been accepted as a Docent in History of Science, Technology and Environment with a specialization in Environmental Humanities and Uses of History. The lecture will be held in Swedish.

Time: Thu 2021-12-09 14.00

Location: https://kth-se.zoom.us/j/61084317666

Language: Swedish

Lecturer: Kati Lindström

How does our understanding of history influence which landscapes we choose to protect?

To protect a cultural or natural landscape is an act of triage where some places, phenomena or species are selected for preservation whereas others are left to change or even disappear. Heritage and nature protection are considered an expert realm where scientists or heritage experts determine the value and urgency of protection of each phenomenon. However, attributing a value to a certain landscape is deeply dependent on how we understand the history of the region, what we consider authentic and where we draw historical and geographical boundaries of relevance. Far too often, these boundaries coincide with today’s nation states and implicate a strong division into nature and culture. This may lead to an over- or underrepresentation of certain phenomena among the protected sites as they are seen important for the hegemonic cultural core. Frequently, it may also ignite conflicts where the experts' and laypersons' valuation of landscapes or species differs significantly. In this lecture, I will walk you through an array of examples from my research in Japan and elsewhere, where a certain view of history could be seen to have shaped today’s heritage.

Page responsible:history@abe.kth.se
Belongs to: Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment
Last changed: Nov 24, 2021