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  • IT will solve tomorrow's energy problems

    Reducing our electricity consumption which will lead to smarter storage and distribution of electricity are two major challenges we face. When the third meeting of the conference ICES begins on 2 September, the arrangers and the researchers at KTH intend to tackle these problems; they also aim to define a number of new challenges which are worthy of further research.

  • Silicon Valley opens doors to KTH entrepreneurs

    A group of Swedish companies with roots at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have been making a splash in Silicon Valley this week. A full week of meetings with investors and entrepreneurs has been set up by Student Inc. and the non-profit organization, Silicon Vikings.

  • Aviation's VIP line must be reviewed

    Sweden's most notable transport researcher has recently presented his thesis and it is an extensive report. Among other things, it appears that better vehicle technologies and fuels are not sufficient to achieve our climate goals, that there is a need to reduce car travel by 30 percent and that air traffic will surpass car traffic within 10 years as regards the emission of greenhouse gases.

  • Touchpads can be used for patient information

    When a cancer has been diagnosed, surgery is often urgently required. To quickly get an overview of the information available about a patient, it is not always adequate with case records and verbal communication. KTH researcher Kristina Groth, together with colleagues has developed a communication tool that runs on touchpads (such as Ipads) and which very quickly provides physicians with an overview of the situation.

  • These are tomorrow’s smart buildings

    According to the EU commission, buildings are responsible for 40 per cent of the total energy consumption and 36 per cent of carbon emissions. At the same time there are directives at EU level which say that there must be big reductions in the energy consumption of buildings over the next decade. This is how it will be done.

  • Silicon Valley opens doors to KTH entrepreneurs

    A group of Swedish companies with roots at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have been making a splash in Silicon Valley this week. A full week of meetings with investors and entrepreneurs has been set up by Student Inc. and the non-profit organization, Silicon Vikings.

  • KTH Great Prize goes to Robyn

    Recording artist Robyn is this year’s recipient of the KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s Great Prize. "So far, it feels unreal and enormously solemn. I may try to take it in a little bit by bit, I think," said Robyn, whose actual name is Robin Miriam Carlsson.

  • MSc Communication Systems

    The master's programme in Communication Systems focuses on wired and wireless network infrastructure, services and applications, and explores how the growth of the internet creates new business ideas and ventures. Students gain a deep understanding of the fundamental design principles behind the internet and novel innovations such as cloud computing, IoT and 5G. Graduates develop secure and sustainable communication systems and services for the next generation.

  • MSc Software Engineering of Distributed Systems

    The master's programme in Software Engineering of Distributed Systems provides students with advanced knowledge for building distributed software applications that operate in a range of devices, from cloud servers to smartphones. Students will explore this rapidly evolving field through specialisation in software development or data analysis. Graduates have expertise in cutting-edge methods and technologies in distributed software systems and are highly demanded by the industry.

Belongs to: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Last changed: Sep 22, 2020