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  • Method could be boost to large scale production of graphene

    The measure by which any conductor is judged is how easily, and speedily, electrons can move through it. On this point, graphene is one of the most promising materials for a breathtaking array of applications. However, its ultra-high electron mobility is reduced when you synthesize larger sheets of the material. Now this barrier to industrial production of graphene may be broken as a result of new research done at KTH with universities in Germany.

  • Capillary flow is harnessed for the first time

    You may have never heard of the capillary effect, but it’s something you deal with every time you wipe up a spill or put flowers in water. Wouter van der Wijngaart has spent most of his life contemplating this phenomenon, which enables liquid to flow through narrow spaces like the fibres of a cloth, or upwards through the stems of flowers, without help from gravity or other forces.

  • Study shows faster, scalable way to make molecular semiconductors

    Visions for what we can do with future electronics depend on finding ways to go beyond the capabilities of silicon conductors. The experimental field of molecular electronics is thought to represent a way forward, and recent work at KTH may enable scalable production of the nanoscale electrodes that are needed in order to explore molecules and exploit their behavior as potentially valuable electronic materials.

  • Permeable capsule could be packed with cells that fight cancer

    One way that cancer may be fought in the future is with micro-sized capsules containing living cells engineered to secrete toxins that attack cancer cells. Although the science of cell micro-encapsulation has yet to overcome certain limitations, recent developments at KTH might finally offer a way forward.

  • Method for tiny cracks in electrodes may mean big boost for nanoelectronics

    The next generation of electronics, as well as ultra-sensitive medical diagnostics, could depend on near atomic scale cracks — or nanogaps — in electrodes. Now there's a method that could pave the way for mass production of nanogap electrodes.

  • New flu test easy as breathing, with faster results

    A method for diagnosing flu virus from breath samples could soon replace invasive nasal swabs and deliver better results faster.

  • This compact and cheap lidar could steer small autonomous vehicles

    For autonomous vehicles, lidar is an essential technology to recognize and detect surrounding objects. Researchers at KTH have taken aim at the key component of lidar, optical beam-stearing, and developed a device that is significantly cheaper to manufacture, lighter and more resource-efficient than previous variations of the technology. This advance could pave the way for smaller autonomous craft such as drones and robots, and help enable better profitability in the vehicle industry.

Belongs to: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Last changed: Sep 22, 2020