News

  • EU testing way to use Sun to break up plastics in wastewater

    Published Nov 07, 2017
    Harnessing the Sun’s radiation to help rid the oceans of microplastic contamination is one of several technical innovations to be developed by a new EU-funded project. Beginning in November 2017, a system developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden for breaking down microplastics from personal care products will be tested for implementation in homes and wastewater treatment plants.

  • Anniversary week kicks off in Dome of Visions

    Published Oct 18, 2017
    Yesterday marked the start of the seminar marathon, the highlight of the anniversary week in which KTH’s campus is celebrating 100 years. “The laying of the foundations of the KTH campus and the university’s evolution go hand in hand with Sweden’s development into an industrial nation,” said President Sigbritt Karlsson in her inaugural address for the anniversary.

  • Chan Zuckerberg Initiative teams up with Swedish researchers to map all cells in human body

    Published Oct 18, 2017
    The Human Protein Atlas and Cell Atlas projects at KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) are teaming up with the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to strengthen research in cell biology and proteomics.

  • Sweden and Japan join forces on ageing population challenges

    Published Sep 27, 2017
    An advanced robot that can perform high precision surgery. Automated patient voice analysis as a method for medical diagnosis and individual treatment. Swedish and Japanese researchers can now start to work more closely together in areas like this to tackle the challenges of an ageing population.

  • KTH degrees rank high on job market

    Published Sep 12, 2017
    A degree from KTH is valuable currency on the job market, a new survey shows. KTH is ranked 94th best university in the world in QS Graduate Employability Rankings, which measures students' chances of getting jobs. KTH is one of two universities in Sweden to be listed in the top 100 (along with Chalmers University), and it ranks 32nd among all European universities.

  • An insider’s look at what goes on with proteins in a cell

    Published Sep 12, 2017
    There have been huge advances in medical science since Robert Hooke coined the term “cell” in 1665, yet the cells of the human body remain a mystery. KTH researcher Emma Lundberg is one of the scientists behind efforts to solve the puzzle of how cells work and ultimately to find new ways to treat disease.

  • Cutting-edge scientists in life sciences speak at symposium in Stockholm

    Published Sep 11, 2017
    Humanity’s origins, protein mapping and the neurobiology of the world’s deadliest animal, the mosquito, are some of the topics addressed by a group of cutting-edge scientists at a life sciences symposium in Stockholm on 15 September. The symposium is a part of the centenary celebrations of the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  • How humans develop echolocation skills is revealed in new research

    Published Sep 07, 2017
    Ongoing research at KTH reveals that when navigating by echolocation, as blind people do, our powers of hearing can be used in ways we never realized.

  • Anniversary to be celebrated with a seminar marathon

    Published Sep 04, 2017
    The speakers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology seminar marathon have now been announced. The marathon will be held during the anniversary week in October that celebrates the 100th year founding of the university campus. “It will be a very interesting programme that demonstrates the full breadth and depth of the whole of KTH,” says Donnie SC Lygonis, who will host the seminar marathon.

  • First-ever look at potentially deadly metabolic disorder that strikes infants

    Published Aug 31, 2017
    At the heart of one serious metabolic disorder is an enzyme whose inner workings and structure have been revealed for the first time by researchers at KTH.

  • Researchers are one step closer to making integrated quantum optical circuits a reality

    Published Aug 30, 2017
    KTH researchers have taken a significant step toward enabling optical quantum information processing on a chip. A new method in quantum nano photonics was published today in Nature Communications.

  • Study offers new targets for drugs against fatty liver disease and liver cancer

    Published Aug 25, 2017
    There may no silver bullet for treating liver cancer or fatty liver disease, but knowing the right targets will help science develop the most effective treatments. KTH researchers have just identified a number of drug targets that can be used in the development of new efficient treatment strategies with minimum side effects.

  • Cancer survival tied to protein levels

    Published Aug 18, 2017
    Researchers from KTH have used a big data medical study to identify genes that could help doctors predict a cancer patient’s prognosis.

  • New observations reveal Crab Nebula's polarised emissions for first time

    Published Aug 10, 2017
    Since it was first observed little more than a thousand years ago, the Crab Nebula has been studied by generations of astronomers. Yet new observations by researchers at KTH show this “cosmic lighthouse” has yet to give up all of its secrets.

  • Mistaken antibodies may have led cancer research down a 20-year dead end

    Published Jun 15, 2017
    For nearly two decades researchers have sought a way to target an estrogen receptor in the hope they could improve breast cancer survival, but an article published today in Nature Communications contends that the effort may never pan out. The reason? The target receptor does not actually appear to be where they believe it to be.

  • Artist Jonas Gardell is awarded KTH Great Prize

    Published Jun 14, 2017
    Swedish author, playwright, comedian and artist Jonas Gardell was named as this year’s recipient of the KTH Stora Pris (Great Prize). Gardell has worked on behalf of the disenfranchised for many years and been recognized with a variety of honors and prizes.

  • Tool to reduce work related injuries available free

    Published Jun 14, 2017
    Employers can reduce the costs of occupational musculoskeletal disorders by using a free online risk management tool created by ergonomic researchers at KTH.

  • More women are applying for Electrical Engineering at KTH

    Published May 31, 2017
    KTH is officially Sweden’s most popular place to study engineering, and one programme that’s seen a spike in demand – Electrical Engineering – also logged a record number of women applicants in the last year, according to new figures from the Swedish Council for Higher Education.

  • Switching to off-peak delivery times reduced city congestion

    Published May 23, 2017
    In some businesses – like supermarkets and restaurants – local restrictions on nighttime deliveries leave distributors no choice but to dispatch trucks during morning rush hours. But lifting these rules could reduce peak traffic volumes and increase transport efficiency, according to a recent study.

  • Strongest artificial spider silk synthesized with cellulose from wood

    Published May 16, 2017
    The strongest yet hybrid silk fibers have been created by scientists in Sweden using all renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable way to make bioactive materials for a wide range of medical uses.

Top page top