News

  • Carbon fibre from wood is used to build car

    Published Feb 09, 2016
    Remember wood paneled station wagons? Well, wood is back, but this time it's not for aesthetics — it's for reducing vehicle weight with renewable materials. Swedish researchers have just produced the world's first model car with a roof and battery made from wood-based carbon fibre.

  • Method for tiny cracks in electrodes may mean big boost for nanoelectronics

    Published Feb 03, 2016
    The next generation of electronics, as well as ultra-sensitive medical diagnostics, could depend on near atomic scale cracks — or nanogaps — in electrodes. Now there's a method that could pave the way for mass production of nanogap electrodes.

  • Going to market with health research

    Published Feb 02, 2016
    In order to make an impact on society, a researcher also must play the role of entrepreneur. In the latest edition of KTH Tech Talks, two experienced innovators in the health field tell their stories.

  • Space flight is subject for first MOOC at KTH

    Published Jan 21, 2016
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm has joined the ranks of universities that educate on a broad front through massive open online courses — or MOOCs — by becoming an edX member.

  • A renewable and biodegradable alternative to Styrofoam

    Published Jan 15, 2016
    Maybe soon we can say goodbye to polystyrene, the petroleum-based material that is used to make Styrofoam. In what looks like an ordinary bicycle helmet, Swedish designers have replaced Styrofoam with a new shock-absorbing material made with renewable and biodegradable wood-based material.

  • Underwater kites could be next wave in clean energy

    Published Jan 14, 2016
    Moored to the ocean floor, they glide in the slow-moving currents to reap energy. A KTH researcher involved in Europe's biggest "underwater kite" project explains how it works.

  • Looking back at a momentous 2015

    Published Dec 23, 2015
    As another momentous year at KTH Royal Institute of Technology comes to an end, let's take a look back at some of the biggest events and news of the last 12 months.

  • Next generation of cancer treatment: small proteins

    Published Dec 21, 2015
    Imagine there was a drug for cancer treatment with almost zero side effects. And you wouldn´t have to take your medicine every fourth hour but every third week. We're closer to developing this kind of treatment than you might think.

  • Farming the sea for food, and more

    Published Dec 21, 2015
    Imagine being able to enjoy a Christmas dinner and, at the same time, make a difference for the environment. Today you can buy caviar and crisp bread made from seaweed, and that's only the beginning for algae-based foods. Seafarm is a project that could help put Sweden in the forefront of seaweed farming worldwide.

  • DNA dates dogs' origins to SE Asia 33,000 years ago

    Published Dec 16, 2015
    A new DNA study confirms that dogs descended from grey wolves, probably in China, about 33,000 years ago.

  • Changing meat "norms" will require political decisions

  • Insects creeping closer to western dinner tables

    Published Dec 16, 2015
    "Please pass the ... crickets." Some Christmas dinner in the not-too-distant future, you just might be asking for someone to pass you a steaming platter of insects.

  • Growing genetically-modified food is a "moral obligation"

    Published Dec 15, 2015
    Nearly 800 million people in the world are chronically undernourished. One possible solution to worldwide hunger and malnutrition is genetically-modified food, argue ethics researchers at KTH.

  • An array of research takes aim at climate change

    Published Dec 10, 2015
    There's no silver bullet to stop global warming. Getting climate change under control will require an array of energy systems and solutions. As COP21 wraps up, we take a look at some of the most interesting recent research at KTH that addresses global warming.

  • Research needed to realise UN development goals

    Published Dec 07, 2015
    Climate change is linked to at least six of the UN's 17 goals for sustainable development. Making these goals a reality requires commitment at all levels — both at COP21 in Paris, and in our own daily lives, says KTH Professor Måns Nilsson.

  • A closer look at how climate policy gets derailed

    Published Dec 02, 2015
    On the long and winding road toward climate policy action, scientific evidence is often the first casualty. A KTH study reveals how the political process loses its way in Sweden.

  • Let there be light!

    Published Nov 24, 2015
    It gets pretty dark in Stockholm during late November, but this week the campus is focused on light. The Festival of Light at the KTH Dome of Visions is being held November 23-28 in conjunction with the UN’s International Year of Light.

  • Blocking body's endocannabinoids may be effective treatment for liver cancer

    Published Nov 23, 2015
    The liver's cannabinoid receptors could be targeted to fight liver cancer in some patients, according to a new study that also offers a way to predict what treatments have the best chance of working.

  • Swedes turn to app to guard their neighbourhoods

    Published Nov 20, 2015
    It's every parent's nightmare. You lose track of your 4-year-old at a playground, and the next thing you know, and you're running around, frantically asking people if they've seen your child.

  • Great Prize winner Tegmark reflects on life and technology

    Published Nov 18, 2015
    What is reality? It is a question perhaps too metaphysical to possibly answer. But to cosmologist Max Tegmark there are no oddities, only probabilities. In his search for answers, he decided that mathematics is the basis upon which the universe rests, and which the universe is made up of.

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