News

  • Imogen Heap charms at opening of Music Tech Fest

    Published Sep 05, 2018
    At the opening of Music Tech Fest this week, recording artist and producer Imogen Heap presented her ambitions for using blockchain technology to manage music rights; and the natural reverb of the underground R1 Reactor Hall invited her at points to break out in song. Exciting things happen when art and technology cross-fertilize.

  • Dosed with crystal meth, brain-on-a-chip reveals brain's neurovascular interactions

    Published Aug 29, 2018
    Demonstrating the effects of the street drug, crystal meth, was the first test for a powerful new platform for studying the complex interactions of the brain’s blood vessels and nerve cells. Unveiled last week in an international study involving KTH researchers, the brain-on-a-chip model integrates living cells on microfluidic chips, enabling researchers to take a first-ever look at how disease and drugs affect the brain.

  • KTH hosts international Music Tech Fest in September

    Published Aug 22, 2018
    The international festival of music ideas and innovation, Music Tech Fest (MTF Stockholm), is coming to KTH in September. During the week Sept. 3-9, a global array of artists, researchers, creators, innovators and – of course – KTH students will meet to explore and invent new ways to create and experience music. The multi-disciplinary event also puts a strong emphasis on gender equality.

  • KTH subjects among top 50 in ShanghaiRanking

    Published Aug 21, 2018
    Eight subjects at KTH have been ranked in the top 50 in the ShanghaiRanking Academic Ranking of World Universities, which were announced recently.

  • Mapping of cells and proteins improved with help of gamers and AI

    Published Aug 20, 2018
    Building on a map that shows hundreds of thousands of microscopic images of human cells, an international research team is working with the gaming community and with artificial intelligence to gain a more granular understanding of patterns of proteins arranged within the body’s cells.

  • Singapore students at KTH create smart applications using Swedish pine

    Published Jul 12, 2018
    A flexible solution for tight office spaces in China. Window glass made from wood fibers. Smart storage solutions for compact homes. These were some of the results when the students at the international master's programme Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management at KTH, most of them from Singapore, were commissioned to develop new applications using Swedish pine. The course was conducted in collaboration with the trade organization Svenskt Trä (Swedish Wood).

  • Possibilities of biocomposites is Iranian researcher's focus

    Published Jul 11, 2018
    Trees mean a lot to doctoral student Hanieh Mianehrow. In her research at the Wallenberg Wood Science Center, she investigates new materials based on wood cellulose. In her free time, she practices her interest in photography on trees and other themes from nature.

  • A new software that democratises AI development

    Published Jul 10, 2018
    A new piece of software is making it easier to create solutions within AI (artificial intelligence). The program, QuantumNet, has been produced by KTH students who want more people to be involved in the creation of AI solutions. In addition, the program enables AI experts to develop AI models more efficiently.

  • New KTH master´s student participates in Airbus´summer academy

    Published Jul 06, 2018
    Produce game-changing concepts linked to global need for food and water security! That´s the challenge at the Airbus Airnovation Summer Academy which closes today. 50 top students from 20 countries participate. One of them is from KTH.

  • AI could improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment

    Published Jun 26, 2018
    Researchers at KTH and Karolinska Institutet have concluded that AI can contribute to increased understanding of how prostate cancer develops, and even improve clinical diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  • Evidence for a new nuclear phase transition could rewrite physics textbooks

    Published Jun 21, 2018
    Physics textbooks might have to be updated now that an international research team has found evidence of an unexpected transition in the structure of atomic nuclei.

  • These nanoscale “crack-junctions” can speed up DNA sequencing

    Published Jun 19, 2018
    The time-consuming, expensive process of sequencing DNA molecules – a technology used to identify, diagnose and possibly find cures for diseases – could become a whole lot faster and cheaper as a result of a new nanofabrication method that takes advantage of nano-sized air-gaps, or nanocracks, in electrically conductive materials.

  • Method could be boost to large scale production of graphene

    Published Jun 15, 2018
    The measure by which any conductor is judged is how easily, and speedily, electrons can move through it. On this point, graphene is one of the most promising materials for a breathtaking array of applications. However, its ultra-high electron mobility is reduced when you synthesize larger sheets of the material. Now this barrier to industrial production of graphene may be broken as a result of new research done at KTH with universities in Germany.

  • Capillary flow is harnessed for the first time

    Published May 21, 2018
    You may have never heard of the capillary effect, but it’s something you deal with every time you wipe up a spill or put flowers in water. Wouter van der Wijngaart has spent most of his life contemplating this phenomenon, which enables liquid to flow through narrow spaces like the fibres of a cloth, or upwards through the stems of flowers, without help from gravity or other forces.

  • Platform brings mobile connection speeds up to 100 Gbps

    Published May 15, 2018
    Even though mobile internet link speeds might soon be 100 Gbps, this doesn’t necessarily mean network carriers will be free of data-handling challenges that effectively slow down mobile data services, for everything from individual device users to billions of internet-of-things connections.

  • Method assembles cellulose nanofibres into a material stronger than spider silk

    Published May 09, 2018
    Researchers at KTH have produced a bio-based material that is reported to surpass the strength of all known bio-based materials whether fabricated or natural, including wood and spider silk.

  • Teklafestival hosts girls workshops at Music Tech Fest

    Published Apr 23, 2018
    Teklafestival, founded by Swedish recording artist Robyn, will be hosting unique technology workshops for girls as part of Music Tech Fest (MTF) Stockholm, in partnership with KTH Royal Institute of Technology.

  • Test shows bone fracture glue provides stronger fixation than dental filler

    Published Apr 23, 2018
    Acute bone fractures may soon be treated with an adhesive patch inspired by dental reconstruction techniques. Researchers at KTH report a new method which they say offers unprecedented bonding strength and a solution to the incredibly difficult problem of setting an adhesive in the wet environment inside the body.

  • ERC grant to Environmental Historian Sverker Sörlin

    Published Apr 20, 2018
    Sverker Sörlin, Professor of Environmental History at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, is one of ten Swedish researchers receiving a grant from the European Research Council’s ERC Advanced Grants, which provides funding to senior researchers. The grant is to enable him to carry out a historical study into the emergence and development of environmental governance.

  • Permeable capsule could be packed with cells that fight cancer

    Published Apr 16, 2018
    One way that cancer may be fought in the future is with micro-sized capsules containing living cells engineered to secrete toxins that attack cancer cells. Although the science of cell micro-encapsulation has yet to overcome certain limitations, recent developments at KTH might finally offer a way forward.

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