• Technique could lower cost of making bioplastics and biofuel

    Published Oct 19, 2016
    The potential for at least partly replacing oil with cellulose as a renewable source of energy and materials has just improved.

  • Low cost method for examining single leukemia cells could transform treatment

    Published Oct 14, 2016
    Leukemia is a disease in which each cell can exhibit different genetic traits, and now KTH researchers have found a cheap way to examine individual leukemia cells. Reported in Nature Communications, the breakthrough could transform leukemia treatment.

  • Nobel economics theory supports KTH research into small business financing

    Published Oct 12, 2016
    Research in contract theory, which was recognized by the Nobel Prize in Economics, is being used at KTH Royal Instiute of Technology to examine the impact of the financial crisis on small businesses.

  • Material physics work at KTH builds on Nobel laureate' discovery

    Published Oct 11, 2016
    Research that was recognized with the Nobel Prize in Physics this week has spawned an entirely new research area that could lead to super-fast quantum computers.

  • For KTH researcher, report of water vapor on Europa isn’t vindication - yet

    Published Oct 06, 2016
    The reported sighting of water plumes on Jupiter’s moon, Europa, appears to confirm observations made by KTH Royal Institute of Technology researcher Lorenz Roth three years ago. Nevertheless, the Swedish scientist remains skeptical.

  • Major investment in 'living laser'

    Published Oct 06, 2016
    Fibre optics will likely become a greater part of our lives in the years ahead, with photonic applications in such areas as medicine and solar energy. That's what KTH professor Fredrik Laurell and his colleagues will be researching with a newly-announced grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  • Ohsumi’s work enables treatments for wide range of illnesses

    Published Oct 04, 2016
    A very important discovery which paves the way for new and more effective treatments for such illnesses as Parkinson’s disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and a host of age-related disorders. That’s KTH protein technology researcher Torbjörn Gräslund’s verdict on the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Medicine to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his work on mapping of the mechanics behind cells' ability to break down and recycle their components.

  • Mikael Östling nominated as Deputy President

    Published Sep 26, 2016
    Mikael Östling has been nominated as the new Deputy President of KTH Royal Institute of Technology. Östling comes to the role from his current position as a researcher and head of department at Kista and brings considerable experience to the institute’s top management.

  • They lower the cost for surface patterning plastics

    Published Sep 14, 2016
    Researchers at the Department of Micro- and Nanosystems at KTH have developed a new way to simultaneously shape and surface treat plastic components. The new method can reduce the manufacturing cost of medical devices, such as diagnostic tools for various diseases.

  • KTH team builds telescope to investigate mysterious Crab pulsar

    Published Jun 30, 2016
    In the coming days, a telescope designed and built at KTH will be launched into the stratosphere to observe the small pulsar at the centre of the spectacular Crab Nebula.

  • New national graduate school will be hub for neutron scattering research

    Published Jun 29, 2016
    KTH is one of six partner universities in a new national graduate school for neutron scattering science, which is a key part of Sweden's emergence as an international hub for this versatile area of research. The director of studies for the new school explains what it means for KTH.

  • Robots can now signal each other to lend a "hand"

    Published Jun 28, 2016
    Sometimes all it takes to get help from someone is to wave at them, or point. Now the same is true for robots. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have completed work on an EU project aimed at enabling robots to cooperate with one another on complex jobs, by using body language.

  • Researchers find cheaper way to produce hydrogen from water

    Published Jun 27, 2016
    KTH researchers have opened a route to large-scale hydrogen production by discovering a better way to split water without relying on precious metals.

  • Regardless of weight, mannose levels point to diabetes risk

    Published Jun 27, 2016
    If you think you're clear of diabetes because your weight is under control, your mannose levels may tell a different story, a new study from SciLifeLab at KTH shows.

  • Bee McBeeface, Beeyoncé are web poll choices to name bees

    Published Jun 13, 2016
    KTH asked the Internet to name the queens of the campus' two new honey bee hives, and the results were perhaps not so surprising. In a web poll held last week, the name "Bee McBeeface" won with 69 percent of the votes, and the name "Beeyoncé" came up second with 16 percent.

  • IT entrepreneur awarded KTH Great Prize

    Published Jun 10, 2016
    Inventor and entrepreneur Stina Ehrensvärd will be awarded KTH's 2016 Great Prize, the university has announced.

  • KTH to help new arrivals get foot in IT job market

    Published Jun 10, 2016
    The KTH School of Computer Science and Communication has received funding from the Wallenberg Foundations to train new arrivals to Sweden who come from countries outside the EU to become employable in the Swedish IT sector. The commissioned education program will involve 3 to 5 months of intensive studies in computer programming.

  • Writer's block? Robot authors face uncertain future

    Published May 24, 2016
    Are readers ready for novels written by robots? The technology exists, but the value of it is less clear.

  • Sexism extends to robots

    Published May 24, 2016
    What gender are the robots that are taking over more and more of our chores? Does it matter whether we call them, "he" or "she"?

  • Self-driving cars could change traffic behaviour

    Published May 24, 2016
    When self-driving cars start appearing on your commute, they're not likely to remind you of the swift Lexus vehicles in Minority Report. Think driving behind your grandpa, instead.

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