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  • Congratulations Mihhail Matskin!

    Mihhail Matskin, your paper "Locality-Aware Workflow Orchestration for Big Data” written in cooperation with Norwegian colleagues at SINTEF and NTNU has been selected as Best Conference Paper at the MEDES 2021 conference. The paper was written as a part of the Horizon 2020 project - DataCloud. Could you tell us a bit about the project and the paper?

  • Cyrille Artho new director of CASTOR

    Cyrille Artho is the new Director of the CASTOR Software research centre. He’s lived in Japan for 11 years, where he worked on analysing networked software and testing together with software security. In his spare time, he likes to run in the forest close to KTH.

  • Improved wireless communication can boost launch of autonomous vehicles

    Collaboration with Princeton University merges machine learning with cellular networks, making cars safer and more energy efficient. Together with experts in machine learning and wireless communication, KTH postdoc José Mairton Barros Da Silva Júnior work on a project that will accelerate the development of safe and reliable autonomous vehicles.

  • Two days on the latest within software

    The software research centre CASTOR organised its second conference on 31 August to 1 September at KTH Nymble. Software researchers, engineers, and students gathered to discuss cutting-edge technology, current software design challenges and software-defined networking.

  • Frustration over parking fines led to action

    A frustration with parking fines led to the development of a parking app that can read signs and help avoid fines. Now KTH students Maximillian Claesson, Industrial Engineering and Management, and Zakarias Hedefalk, Computer Science, are aiming for European markets.

  • New master's programme in sustainable digitalisation

    High requests from both students and staff at KTH resulted in the new master's programme being established at record speed. It is now open for applications, with study start in August 2024.

  • Elevated credibility in AI-generated information

    A new graph database management system is under development at KTH. Using graph technology in combination with artificial intelligence (AI), the system could assist in planning everything from healthcare to smart cities with a built-in trust feature.

  • Meet Emil Björnson, new professor at EECS

    Emil Björnson, newly appointed professor of wireless communication at the Division of communication systems, congratulations on your new position! And congratulations on the IEEE fellow award!

  • Two awards for the Division of Software and Computer Systems

    We talked to Daniel Lundén and Hamid Ghasemirahni who have both recently been awarded for their research.

  • Students hacked cars – amazing results

    Imagine someone being able to unlock your car without keys – how would you feel? This proved to be entirely possible as students in Computer Science hacked cars.

  • 28 ideas that will attract new students

    A new initiative with 28 ready-to-go ideas for high school projects aims to evoke interest in technical studies. Prospective students are encouraged to write about social robots, brain function, data analysis and cyber security.

  • Researchers found leak in cryptographic algorithm

    New and better methods are needed to protect sensitive data from hackers. This is the conclusion KTH researchers made when they managed to break an implementation of CRYSTALS-Kyber, a post quantum cryptography algorithm considered resistant to quantum computer attacks.

  • Students given a crash course in disaster medicine

    Packing wounds, carrying injured people, and dealing with theatrical blood are not part of a computer engineer's everyday life. But for the students developing a game to practice tactical medicine, it is. At least for one day.

  • New tool reduces static Java code violations

    SORALD fixes rule violations raised by SonarQube, one of the most popular static code analysers used by developers.

  • Four codes that can change the future of energy use and cancer treatments

    Over the next four years, researchers at KTH will optimize four codes that can have significant impact on global energy use and the treatment of cancer patients. But competition is fierce between researchers in Europe, Japan, China and the US.

  • Campus art installation captures the richness of basic software actions

    Art can be a powerful projector of breakthrough science. During the 2022 Nobel Week Lights, an annual lights festival taking place during the Nobel Week, KTH launched an artwork called un|fold, which captures the richness of a simple software action.

  • Nobel in Africa discusses predictability in Science

    The Nobel Symposium “Predictability in Science in the age of AI” brings together leading experts in AI and sciences to discuss and explore various issues, including the limits of the Big Data approach.

  • Researchers can help cut down global data center power consumption

    Researchers have discovered a way to reduce power consumption in data centres significantly. They offload computation by converting particular types of commodity Network Interface Cards into processors.

  • This is EECS’ contribution to ForskarFredag

    Friday, 30 September, is the time for ForskarFredag at Vetenskapens Hus. Representants from EECS will be competing in presentation technology, lectures in swallowable microsystems and presenting students' projects created in advanced graphics and electrical engineering.

  • Award winning algorithm research

    Jan van den Brand is the winner of the 2021 EATCS Distinguished Dissertation Award. Read about his algorithm research, the news in this field and which problems he would like to solve in the future

  • Understanding the inexplicable in AI gave Stefan the award

    Research on understanding the inexplicable reason why AI works so well gave Stefan Neumann, a postdoc in the division of Theoretical Computer Science, the Heinz Zemanek Award. The award is granted biannually for excellent degree dissertations in informatics and related areas.

  • KTH researchers behind breakthrough set to halve data centre energy consumption

    Researchers at KTH have found a way to improve the efficiency of the world’s internet servers. By co-ordinating data traffic, they have succeeded in increasing the speed of computations and data transfers. Their software has the potential to halve the energy consumption of data centres.

  • Awarded by Google for his research on cyber security

    "Our research outcome has the potential to impact millions of users by discovering security vulnerabilities in real-world applications." Musard Balliu has been awarded by the Google Research Scholar Program, focused on funding world-class research conducted by early-career professors. We have talked to him about his research in cyber security and what this means for him.

  • Can the brain keeps useful information while ignoring unuseful noise

    Imagine you're in a stadium reporting on a game. It's a loud environment which you don't want to transmit. But when you're interviewing a player, then you do want to transmit. Wouldn't it be great if you could automatically switch on or off the microphone based on the type of information, i.e. noise vs the interview?

  • Project from EECS increases road safety

    We talked to Dilian Gurov about his Vinnova funded project "AVerT2: Automated Verification and Testing" – a collaboration between KTH and Scania – which will help increase road safety. Read more about Dilians research and the project in the interview.

  • Researchers unlock the secret to the brain's working memory

    New insights from brain science can lead to the development of artificial intelligence possessing cognitive abilities similar to humans.

  • New technique boosts accuracy and efficiency in probabilistic programming

    Programming can be a time-consuming and error-prone task. KTH researchers propose an automated technique that relieves developers of manual processes.

  • Making data accessible - despite server and network issues

    A software developed by KTH has enabled cloud services to be easier to build and more resilient to failures. “I wanted to make fault-tolerant systems easy to build and use, contrary to what is often perceived of such systems,” says Harald Ng, PhD student at KTH.

  • Joint forces for a cyber campus

    There is a significant skills shortage in the cyber security area in Sweden. This has led Pontus Johnson, professor at KTH’s Center for Cyber Defense and Information Security, to push for a new cyber campus with several actors, including the Swedish Armed Forces.

  • Honoured for his work in cyber security

    Gunnar Karlsson from the Department of Network and Systems Engineering recently received the Headquarters Medal of Merit from the Swedish Armed Forces for his commitment to training cyber soldiers and specialist officers.

  • AI in coding awarded for impact

    For a long time, coding was tediously manual, but in 2009, Martin Monperrus, Professor of Software Engineering at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, and his team realised that built-in AI could help make suggestions. That tool has changed the lives of millions of user software developers.

  • New cybersecurity analysis solution leads to significant reduction in energy consumption

    By offloading calculations for complex cybersecurity analyses to network accelerators, energy consumption can be reduced by over 30 times, according to Mariano Scazzariello, a postdoctoral researcher at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. This is an essential piece of the puzzle as internet traffic continues to grow, requiring more and more power for processing. ”It indicates a shift towards more sustainable practices," he says.

  • Emil is KTH's first cybersecurity engineer

    Following the completion of his master's thesis on behavioural biometrics, Emil Lantz is graduating as KTH's first cybersecurity engineer. ”It feels really good to finish,” he says.

  • Developing intuitive tools for molecular simulations on powerful computers

    To deliver open-source code that anyone worldwide can use, the Parallel Computing Centre (PDC) recently made a long-awaited breakthrough in creating code for quantum chemistry on graphics processing units (GPUs). "What we see is proof that the developed algorithm works," says Patrick Norman, Director of the PDC.

  • How to stop cyber-attacks with honeypots

    In the ever-evolving landscape of cyber warfare, defending against human-controlled cyberattacks requires innovative strategies. A recent study conducted by students at KTH delves into the realm of cyber defence, explicitly focusing on the placement of honeypots – deceptive traps designed to mislead potential attackers. This investigation aims to shed light on cyberspace's most effective defence strategies.

Belongs to: KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Last changed: Sep 22, 2020