News

  • ERC grant to Environmental Historian Sverker Sörlin

    Published Apr 20, 2018
    Sverker Sörlin, Professor of Environmental History at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, is one of ten Swedish researchers receiving a grant from the European Research Council’s ERC Advanced Grants, which provides funding to senior researchers. The grant is to enable him to carry out a historical study into the emergence and development of environmental governance.

  • Next-generation, hormone-free contraceptive for women

    Published Mar 28, 2018
    A hormone-free women's contraceptive with no side effects is one promising use for a new technique developed by researchers in Sweden to tighten up the mucous membrane – the body’s first line of defense in protecting its inner lining.

  • Hydrogen extraction breakthrough could be game-changer

    Published Feb 23, 2018
    Researchers at KTH have successfully tested a new material that can be used for cheap and large-scale production of hydrogen – a promising alternative to fossil fuel.

  • Wave energy device tests begin in North Atlantic

    Published Feb 13, 2018
    Europe is on a quest to make renewable energy available to remote coastal areas and islands. That’s the motivation behind the testing of a powerful Swedish-designed wave energy conversion system in the North Atlantic.

  • Anniversary week kicks off in Dome of Visions

    Published Oct 18, 2017
    Yesterday marked the start of the seminar marathon, the highlight of the anniversary week in which KTH’s campus is celebrating 100 years. “The laying of the foundations of the KTH campus and the university’s evolution go hand in hand with Sweden’s development into an industrial nation,” said President Sigbritt Karlsson in her inaugural address for the anniversary.

  • Switching to off-peak delivery times reduced city congestion

    Published May 23, 2017
    In some businesses – like supermarkets and restaurants – local restrictions on nighttime deliveries leave distributors no choice but to dispatch trucks during morning rush hours. But lifting these rules could reduce peak traffic volumes and increase transport efficiency, according to a recent study.

  • Strongest artificial spider silk synthesized with cellulose from wood

    Published May 16, 2017
    The strongest yet hybrid silk fibers have been created by scientists in Sweden using all renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable way to make bioactive materials for a wide range of medical uses.

  • Global competition for sustainable fashion

    Published Mar 27, 2017
    How can the fashion industry become more sustainable? The Global Change Award competition – in which KTH Royal Institute of Technology is a partner – highlights innovations from around the world. Voting is open to all from 27 March. Make your voice heard – and influence how the million euro grant is divided between five winners.

  • Silk from milk? New method binds proteins into threads

    Published Feb 08, 2017
    By all appearances, cows have little in common with spiders. Yet despite the two species’ obvious differences, new research shows that ordinary milk can be used to spin artificial silk – a breakthrough that could open new doors for alternative plastics and regenerative medicine.

  • Innovation hub for global development launched

    Published Jan 26, 2017
    Now the ball is rolling for KTH's investment in a training and collaboration model that aims at finding innovative solutions to global challenges.

  • With new tool, cities can plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits

    Published Jan 09, 2017
    The rollout of Sweden’s first wireless charging buses earlier this month was coupled with something the rest of the world could use – namely, a tool for cities to determine the environmental and financial benefits of introducing their own electrified bus networks.

  • New research shows one way LED efficiency is far from optimal

    Published Nov 25, 2016
    Even though LED lights are among the most energy efficient available, there’s still plenty of room for improvement. Researchers recently found that light emitting diodes’ efficiency can be impeded by trace amounts of iron, which is a byproduct of LED production.

  • Technique could lower cost of making bioplastics and biofuel

    Published Oct 19, 2016
    The potential for at least partly replacing oil with cellulose as a renewable source of energy and materials has just improved.

  • Researchers find cheaper way to produce hydrogen from water

    Published Jun 27, 2016
    KTH researchers have opened a route to large-scale hydrogen production by discovering a better way to split water without relying on precious metals.

  • Bee McBeeface, Beeyoncé are web poll choices to name bees

    Published Jun 13, 2016
    KTH asked the Internet to name the queens of the campus' two new honey bee hives, and the results were perhaps not so surprising. In a web poll held last week, the name "Bee McBeeface" won with 69 percent of the votes, and the name "Beeyoncé" came up second with 16 percent.

  • Sexism extends to robots

    Published May 24, 2016
    What gender are the robots that are taking over more and more of our chores? Does it matter whether we call them, "he" or "she"?

  • Tests show how trucks can reuse engine heat for power

    Published May 20, 2016
    A 195-year-old discovery is behind a new system that will save vehicles hundreds of litres of fuel and reduce their carbon emissions by as much as 2 to 3 tonnes per year.

  • Underwater kites could be next wave in clean energy

    Published Jan 14, 2016
    Moored to the ocean floor, they glide in the slow-moving currents to reap energy. A KTH researcher involved in Europe's biggest "underwater kite" project explains how it works.

  • Farming the sea for food, and more

    Published Dec 21, 2015
    Imagine being able to enjoy a Christmas dinner and, at the same time, make a difference for the environment. Today you can buy caviar and crisp bread made from seaweed, and that's only the beginning for algae-based foods. Seafarm is a project that could help put Sweden in the forefront of seaweed farming worldwide.

  • Changing meat "norms" will require political decisions

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