Interaction Design

The Interaction Design team creates novel interactions with electronically responsive artefacts and services. We work in a designerly manner, approaching digital technologies with novel design- and aesthetic angles. The aim is to understand and design for deeply engaging, human needs-driven, activities, providing the tools and user experiences that let people enjoy, be creative, be comforted and that bring wellbeing and engagement to their everyday lives. Topics include arts & crafts, somaesthetic design, aesthetic engagement with energy and sustainability, smart implicit interaction, interactive playgrounds, design for emotional health, and the obsolescence and impermanence of interactive technology.

We do not approach design work in a value-free, neutral manner. Certain ideals guide our design explorations. We have, for example, proposed the philosophy of wabi-sabi, which through the notion of “nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect” forms relevant and thought-provoking principles for the design of interactive technology, especially in the Internet of Things-era.

A second ideal that has gained traction in the team is somaesthetics designs, that is, applications where the interaction subtly supports users’ attention towards their own body, enriching their sensitivity to, enjoyment and appreciation of their own somatics. Through a somaesthetic design perspective, we may achieve user experiences rhyming with the pleasures and displeasures, beats, rhythms, and richness of the living body – our human condition.

Our design work is firmly based in crafting through tinkering or bricolage as an alternative to the structured computer science programming processes otherwise employed. It is a mode, or attitude, to familiarise oneself with physical-digital materials in an explorative yet playful way. We see design as a process of exploiting the aesthetic affordances of materials to arrive as innovative prototypes – where materials can be physical materials, such as leather, steel or wood, or digital materials, such as data, algorithms, sensors, actuators, or wireless connectivity.

The team is in charge of several interaction design courses at KTH.

Most of our team members work together in an open office space on the top floor of the main building at KTH Valhallavägen, Lindstedtsvägen 5. For more information or for arranging a visit, please contact our team leader Kristina Höök, khook@kth.se

For more updated information about our activities, please visit our team blog.

For information about specific research projects:

Arts & Crafts

CIVIS

Digitala och fysiska lekmiljöer

Ett bilfritt år

Somaestetic Experiences

STandUP for Energy

Med rörelse i tankarna

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